Resilient!

MInneapolis’ “Resilience Officer” has departed, after seven months, after submitting no work product of any kind:

[Former DFL legislatore Kate] Knuth, an environmental educator and former DFL legislator, spent her first months in the job interviewing people and conducting a survey, but had not delivered any finished work product before she resigned.

Mychal Vlatkovich, a spokesman for Mayor Jacob Frey, said they’ve begun looking for a replacement and hope to hire someone by the end of March who will focus on the mayor’s goals. He said the mayor’s office did not ask Knuth to step down, but declined to answer whether she was allowed to continue in the position and referred further questions to Knuth and former City Coordinator Spencer Cronk, who is now the city manager of Austin, Texas.

I’ve always wondered what a “Resiliehce Officer” does. Reading the job title, I assumed it covered things like network security, hardening city communications against hacking and terrorism, and coming up with plans for responding to things like natural disasters, terrorist attacks, and winning college hockey titles.

The position is designed to reflect the priorities of the administration, and in this case we’re going to be focused more narrowly on expanding access to affordable housing, and the impact that would have on our other goals, including building an inclusive economy and strengthening police-community relations,” Vlatkovich said.

In other words, a “Resilience Officer” is in charge of making the city look like it’s trying to dooooooooo something about progressive “dog whistle” issues.

Kniuth’s job was apparently funded by a grant.  But Saint Paul, not to be left behind by an urban progressive fad, is jumping on the hybrid bandwagon:

While St. Paul is not one of the 100 “resilient cities,” the city has hired former Council President Russ Stark as chief resilience officer. Stark, who starts on Thursday, will be paid a salary of $105,000 through the city’s general fund. The city of St. Paul says he will “promote sustainability strategies aimed at protecting Saint Paul families from the effects of climate change.”

People on social media have commentned “That doesn’t seem all that resilient”.

They miss the point.

The resilience is in the concept – which is “to transfer taxpayer dollars to the DFL’s political class”, keeping the likes of Knuth and Stark paid and fed and involved in “progressive” politics.  It’s a part of institutional life in Minnesota, and the reason most “community non-profits” exist, and the reason getting elected as a DFL pol means never having to look for work again as long as you live.

And that is resilience!

PS:   Kate Knuth is the daughter of the Saint Paul school administrator at the end of this episode.  Yep, “public service” runs in families, doesn’t it? )

Danger, Wisconsin

Democrats are fleeing the hellholes they and their policy created

…but bringing the politics that caused the problem with them:

According to the latest United Van Lines year-end list, the top five states people are leaving is made up mostly of liberal, Democrat infested states. Of the top five worst states, only the last, Kansas, has a GOP dominated government. The other four Illinois (a state that usually tops nearly every metric that marks a failed state), New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut are all hopelessly Democrat.

Another liberal state that is losing citizens faster than it is gaining replacements is the failed state of California. A recent Mises Institute report showed that California, New York, and Illinois were losing more citizens to other U.S. states far faster than the rest of the country.

Indeed, a recent report by San Francisco’s CBS affiliate noted that people are leaving the Bay area in droves because no one who isn’t a billionaire can afford to live there due to high taxes and exorbitant property costs.

On the other hand, another study showed that the top five states Americans are moving into were nearly all Republican states. with Idaho, Washington State, Nevada, Tennessee, and Alaska topping the list — Washington being the only Democrat-dominated state on that list.

It’s nothing new; it’s how Vermont, Colorado, and Edina Minnesota all went from solid conservative holdouts to Democrat cesspools.

I do love Glenn Reynold’s idea:

GOP donors need to set up a sort of “weclome wagon” to target blue state emigrants and epxlain why the Red States they’re moving to are better than the places they left”

I’d worry that the MNGOP has some trouble with new arrivals – but I don’t think we’re one of the states that’s gaining.

Maybe all you folks in CD3?

Choice

A friend of the blog emails:

Found very different headlines from NPR regarding food choices. Democrats love telling the poor what to eat when they see fit. Tax sugary drinks. They need to eat healthier, why, the tax helps fight obesity:

Even this article seems concerned that SNAP recipients may be using food stamps to buy the cheapest food, which “isn’t healthy for them,” and the article even has to question, once again, are SNAP recipients consuming too much sugary beverages?

But, now that Trump is proposing a change, a change in which the government does exert more control over what SNAP recipients might be given to eat, there is all of a sudden a different tone? Suddenly, Trump is some evil government official trying to tell people what to eat? Give me a break.

Moral, intellectual and logical inconsistency  is less important to Big Left than adherence to narrative.

As Long As You Want To Trash The Constitution To “Save Lives”…

First things first: Berg’s 18th Law is in full effect. (“Nothing the media writes/says about any emotionally charged event – a mass shooting, a police shooting, anything – should be taken seriously for 48 hours after the original incident. It will largely be rubbish, as media outlets vie to “scoop” each other even on incorrect facts“). CNN has already fallen for one social media hoax on the subject.

After atrocities like the one that they’re still sorting out in Florida – a gun free zone with a cop on scene, no less – there’s usually a wave of people who take to social media to offer “thoughts and prayers” to the victims, their families and the community.

That wave is quickly followed by a wave of people say “Stuff the hopes and prayers! We need to dooooooooo something!”. That “something” is, inevitably, trample on the Constitution – in a way that won’t save one single life.

You want to trash the Constitution in a way that *could* save lives? Impose censorship over the mass media. Because spree killers use a variety of weapons – guns, machetes, gasoline, fertilizer – but they all 1 seek *immortality*. They want to be *famous*.

And who grants fame and immortality in our society? The media and its 24 hour news cycle.

So if you deprive a mentally unstable but violent person of one means to kill, they’ll find another.  So why not deprive them of motive – their mass media eternal reward?

Now, the people howling “Stupid Christians!  Doooooooooo Something!” would be largely but not entirely horrified at the thought of gagging the media after mass shootings.   And no, it likely wouldn’t work complete.y – but it’d have much more effect on spree killings.

So at any rate – all of you howling at people asking for thoughts and prayers and asking people to dooooooo something?  You’re less useful in the great scheme of things.   Drop it.

 

1 Except, generally, terrorists.  Does that include the San Bernardino and Little Rock murderers, and Omar Mateen?  What am I, a psychiatrist?

Appropriation

“Aliza Worthington” describes herself as “Brooklyn-bred, Baltimore by choice, music snob, history nerd, family-obsessed, friend-dependent, amateur glassblower, passable dancer, & since age 40, a writer”

She may have had a point until she hit that last clause.

Ms. Worthington – a honky – writes a piece in the ever-more-loathsome “Medium” entitled “Black Panther” Is Not For Us, White People“.

I’m gonna stop just short of telling white people NOT to see it. To be clear, I hope this movie makes A BAZILLION GAFLILLION SCHMATRILLION dollars opening weekend, and wins every single award possible. Speaking to my fellow white people, though, can we please consider letting Black people have this joy without us ruining it for them with our presence?

We have ruined, and continue to ruin so much for Black folx.[That’s right. Folx.  She is that dumb – Ed] Yes, often just by inserting ourselves where they are rightfully trying to enjoy their greatness in peace, and without our white nonsense.

Ms. Worthington:   do black “folx” (#VomitInMouth) need your help defending their culture?

I’m sure they’ll rise as one and offer their “thanx”.

Or, if you get tickets, and you notice it’s sold out, and some Black folx are outside bummed they weren’t able to get tickets, give your tickets to them and go to Applebee’s instead.

How very, very twee.

It just has to be tough, being both a honky and ˆ”authentic”.   Well done.

Ms. Worthington:  I’m going to exercise that greatest “white privilege” (I choose to call it “freedom”, and invite everyone of all races to partake in it) and go wherever I damn well want, do what I want, and mock your appropriation of the voice of American blacks.  They don’t need your help.

CNN Is Shocked…Shocked…

CNN howls that a “gun industry lobbyist” “helped write” a “deregulation” proposal:

The white paper was produced by Acting ATF Deputy Director Ronald B. Turk and dated on President Trump’s inauguration day, January 20, 2017. It says the agency should consider allowing gun dealers to sell across state lines, loosen restrictions on gun noise suppressors, and pull back on its scrutiny of gun shops.

“If I am missing the mark on a major issue or disregarding a major discussion point any feedback you have would be appreciated,” Turk wrote to the lobbyist, Mark Barnes, on January 9, 2017. “My hope is that the agency can demonstrate flexibility where appropriate and identify areas for further discussion, recognizing that solving everyone’s concerns on each side would be difficult.”

CNN also whimpers:

The documents on the drafting of the white paper, as provided by the ATF, do not reflect any input from gun-control groups.

Which stands to reaason; they are jointly and severally worthless; they provide no factual, moral or political value to any policy discussion on the issue. None of them.

But their beef is that a “gun lobbyist” provided policy feedback to the ATF – reminiscent of the chorus of catcalling from the ignorant six year ago about the “American Legislative Exchange Council” providing model legislation to legislators, exactly as dozens or hundreds of other policy think tanks do.

Even – although the “think” is a bit of a stretch – gun grabber groups, as we discovered five years ago when the DFL, emboldened by their electoral sweep in 2012, copied and pasted reams of gun grab legislation from California, Maryland and Connecticut.

You’d think CNN would check those sort of facts…

…oh, I slay me.

The Wheel Just Keeps On Spinning

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

We’re headed for another fight over Dreamers, illegal aliens brought into the country as minors by their parents.  Democrats and RINOs like McCain want amnesty on the grounds that minors aren’t responsible for their actions so it’s humane to let them stay rather than force them to return to a country they never knew.

Okay, but there are about a million Dreamers.  The instant you give citizenship to Dreamers, they can use family reunification rules to sponsor their parents for citizenship. Now we’re up to 3 million. That’s a lot of new Democrat voters.

Why are we having an amnesty discussion at all?  Because the Dreamers came here without permission.  How’d they do that?  Strolled across the border.  Why didn’t somebody stop them?  Because there’s no wall on the border.  Why not?

Look, there are only two possibilities.  First one, Open Borders.  Make the US border with Mexico as wide open like the border between Minnesota and Wisconsin – anybody can enter, thieves, gangsters, terrorists, without limitation.  In that case, we shouldn’t bother with formal citizenship: everybody who stands on our soil is a citizen.  The dirt will magically transform them from their culture to ours.  In fact, why should they have to make the trip at all?  Anybody with the spirit and desire to be an American should be able to vote for Democrats and receive welfare checks, regardless of where they in the world they live.  No borders.

Second option, some people get in, but others do not.  It doesn’t matter who does not, the fact some people are not allowed in brings up the most urgent question: how will you keep them out?

The Wall is too expensive? Fine, what’s your alternative proposal to keep them out?  Electronic countermeasures, virtual wall, drones?  Didn’t work to keep out the 3 million we’re going to amnesty – how will it work to keep out the next 3 million?  30 million?  300 million?

Prohibition without enforcement is functionally equivalent to acceptance.   Either we have a border or we don’t.  Either we keep undesirables out or we don’t.   –

I think we ought to build The Wall to keep out undesirables.  65 other nations around the world agree with me.  If you’ve got a better idea, let’s hear it.  We’ve got about a week to decide before amnesty is given and the cycle starts all over again.

Joe Doakes

It is, to coin a phrase, a time for choosing.  Is this a sovereign nation with a culture worth preserving, or not?

They Just Keep On Ticking

Nearly six years ago on this blog, we noted the 50th anniversary of the production of the final B52 Stratofortress – a plane whose design processs kicked off as the rubble from World War 2 was still smoking, which first flew in the early fifties, went into series production in 1952, and whose final example rolled off the line before I was born.

The Air Force has been working to replace the B52 – the BUFF Big Ugly Fat Fella) or BMF (Boeng Multirole Flight-platform), as its crews and support staff call it – almost since it first rolled off the production line.

First came the =B58 Hustler – a sleek, fast, incredibly flashy plane that broke all sorts of world records, and lasted maybe five years in front line service due to mechanical and electronic bugs and cost overruns.

The FB-111 was intended to augment the B-52 rather than supplant it; it was part of the strategic bomber fleet for perhaps a decade and a half before being retired.

The B1 and B1A?   After a protracted, costly development dogged by systems issues and a left-leaning Congress that was drunk with pacifistic power after pulling the US out of Vietnam, the plane was downgraded into the more pedestrian but fairly successful B1B, currently gracing the skies of South Dakota from its home base near Rapid City – and will be for another fifteen years, according to the Air Force, retiring a decade or so before the original plan.

Same with the B2 “Spirit” – the first strategic “stealth” bomber, which will also be leaving service in the early 2030s.

But the B52?  It’s going to outlive them all:

“With an adequate sustainment and modernization focus, including new engines, the B-52 has a projected service life through 2050, remaining a key part of the bomber enterprise well into the future,” said Gen. Robin Rand, Air Force Global Strike Command commander, in a statement issued by the Air Force.

But today’s B-52 has evolved from the planes first flown in the ’50s. The Stratofortress has undergone numerous upgrades and modernization over the years, including the addition of an advanced communications system that displays real-time intelligence feeds overlaid on moving maps…The Air Force plan calls for the B-1s and B-2s to be “incrementally retired,” once enough [of the brand new, just-started-design] B-21s are operational. “If the force structure we have proposed is supported by the Congress, bases that have bombers now will have bombers in the future,” Wilson said. “They will be B-52s and B-21s.”

The B21, of course, will run into delays and overruns, and the B52 will (I predict) be in service through the 2070s.

Congratulations Are In Order

Rachel Stassen-Berger – who’s been a fixture in political coverage in the Metro for as long as I’ve been paying attention – has moved on up to a politics editor job at the Des Moines Register.

Stassen-Berger will oversee the Register’s politics and policy team, which includes coverage of state government, health care, Iowa’s congressional delegation and the Iowa caucuses. She will start in mid-March.

Stassen-Berger has covered the Statehouse in St. Paul for 16 years. Most recently, she was the capitol bureau chief, as well as a reporter and columnist, for the St. Paul Pioneer Press. She has also served as a political writer for the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

The Register doesn’t have quite the sheen it did thirty years ago – but it’s a great move for Stassen-Berger, and I wish her all the best.

Walter Duranty Is Alive And Well

American legacy media trip over, beclown selves with their coverage of the Nadia Comaneci of this year’s winter olympics…

North Korea:

No foreign leader has enjoyed coverage as good as North Korea’s Kim Yo Jong since Vogue profiled Asma al-Assad, first lady of Syria, back in 2011. (That was right before Assad’s regime killed tens of thousands of people and used chemical weapons in the Syrian civil war.) A sampling: Reuters: “North Korea has emerged as the early favorite to grab one of the Winter Olympics’ most important medals: the diplomatic gold.” CNN: “Kim Jong Un’s sister is stealing the show at the Winter Olympics!” Business Insider: “From her “side-eye” of US Vice President Mike Pence to hints at Korean unification, Kim has stolen the spotlight at the Winter Olympics.” Washington Post: “The ‘Ivanka Trump of North Korea’ captivates people in the South at the Olympics.”

All that is necessary to get the coastal media’s blessing is to  be the opposite of Donald Trump.

Without whom this rapprochement, real or fabricated, would not be happening in the first place.

Relentless Incuriosity

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

This article illustrates the poverty of local gun reporting.

Granted that this crew sounds like a bunch of losers who probably ought to be off the streets, a few points about Minnesota law:

It is legal to own night vision goggles.

It is legal to make your own firearm as long as you don’t sell it.  Homemade firearms do not require serial numbers.

It is legal to own a silencer, and to make one yourself, as long as you get the federal tax stamp. Possession itself is not illegal.

It is legal to own a semi-automatic replica of a submachine gun, such as the Uzi that fires one shot per trigger pull.

It is legal to own a real machine gun, if you have the tax stamp.

It is also legal to own a decommissioned rocket propelled grenade launcher (it might be legal to own a firing one, as long as you don’t have the ammo for it, I don’t know).  The article doesn’t say which they had.

It is legal to have as many rounds of ammunition as you like.

It is legal to have a separate fire-proof room to store firearms and ammunition.  And it’s legal to conceal that room from burglars.

An altered serial number on a gun is a crime and being a drug user in possession of a firearm is a crime. Those crimes are buried beneath the breathless recital of all the non-crimes.

There might be actual crimes here, or it could be a couple of minor offenses and a whole lot of politically correct posturing.  It would be nice to have more intelligent reporting so we could tell what’s going on.

I’m not holding my breath.

Joe Doakes

Reporters are supposed to be relentlessly curious, and to try to understand the things they report about.   And on many issues they are – including, with some reporters, at some times, on the issue of firearms and 2nd Amendment rights.

But most of the Twin Cities media is no more interested in finding the actual facts than, say, a giggly insecure snarkblogger from somewhere outside Montivideo might be.

The Higher Education Butane Balloon

Students at the University of Wisconson’s Stout Campus must prove they’ve absorbed the PC narrative to Big Brother’s satisfaction before being granted a diploma:

In order to fulfill the requirement, students must complete at least six credits from a list of approved courses that address at least two out of four categories: Global Self-Awareness, Global Knowledge, Global Viewpoint, and Global Engagement.

“Global self-awareness” courses, for instance, focus on embracing the “values of diverse others,” helping students to “develop appreciation for diverse voices and stories and the contributions of cultures and countries different from one’s own.”

The “global knowledge” goal, meanwhile, addresses “the deeply interconnected nature of the world,” with courses exploring concepts like how “the impact of globalized capitalism and neoliberalism on economic systems, inter and intra-societal stratification, civil and human rights, and sustainability” form the “historical roots” of inequities around the world.

The “global viewpoint” category aims to introduce students to different cultural and historical perspectives, while the “global engagement” element teaches students to “take effective critical action” on the basis of their new knowledge by “contributing to positive change in globally diverse, interconnected, and interdependent natural, social, and business environments.”

It took a moment to realize they weren’t talking about Evergreen State.

More Unexpected Results

The Canadian province of Ontario – which includes Toronto and, Ontario natives tell me, a major city named “Tronna” – raised its minimum wage in January.

Coincidentally, nearly 3% of the province’s part time jobs evaporated  that very month.  Unexpectedly!:

It gained approximately 8,500 full-time positions but lost roughly 59,300 part-time gigs, according to data provided by the
agency, which noted the figures are rounded.

That means there was 3.4 per cent or 46,100 fewer part-time posts in January 2018 than the same time the previous year.

Some economists said it’s possible Ontario’s minimum wage increase played a role in those declines, but noted it’s important not to read too much into one month of data.

Also, it’s important not to impugn the narrative.

Perhaps the economists are graduates of the Feminist Business School

What Could Possibly Go Wrong?

And to think they say the left is utterly clueless about economics;   Feminist Business School promises to remove the profit motive from the free market

The Feminist Business School, founded by Evergreen State College graduate Jennifer Armbrust, teaches that capitalism is an “economy that values masculine traits” such as “meritocracy,” “competition,” and “individualism.” The California-based site recently launched two more online courses to coach aspiring businesswomen on how to “topple the patriarchy” and promote a more “feminist economy.”

Shunning the “profit seeking motive” of traditional commerce, the Feminist Business School advocates that businesswomen adopt more “feminine traits” such as “gratitude,” “intimacy,” and “connecting with nature.”

Did we mention it started at Evergreen State?

Due To NARN Control

Join me from 1-3PM today, back in the studio after two weeks on the icecap,  on the NARN!

Today on the show:

  • Dr. John Lott!
  • Muslims and the MNGOP

Don’t forget – King Banaian is on from 9-11AM on AM1440, and Brad Carlson is  on “The Closer” edition of the NARN Sundays from 2-3PM.

So tune in the Northern Alliance! You have so many options:

Join us!

Words Will Never Harm Me

This American Life is a guity…well, occasionally pleasure.  Sometimes just guilt.

But every once in a while – twice a year – they run an episode that’s so good, I wind up driving around the Midway and Roseville for half an hour waiting for it to finish.

This past weekend was one of them –  partly because it was just so good, and partly because the timing was perfect.

Part 1 (they call them “Act 1” and “Act 2”, and so on, which is far fron the twee-est, most precious and pretentious thing about TAL) is a story with, by Public Radio standards, a real “Man Bites Dog” is a nice apertif – a story about a young feminist Youtube “star” who discovers – try not to be shocked – that her fellow travelers on the left are really really intolerant of dissent.   Give the whole thing a listen.

Part 2?  After all the  gumflapping this week about Republicans’ in Minnesota and their relationship with Muslims – including my own go-arounds with members of the GOP over this issue – “Act 2” goes over the problems a staunchly pro-gun legislator in one of Louisiana’s most conservative parishes had when she proposed a bijll that would have banned realistic replica guns in schools.  The bill was neither an attack on the 2nd Amendment nor an especially good idea (it should be a local ordinance, not a state statute for starters), but the tendency of people to get wrapped around the axle over surface terminology without really understanding an issue is pretty astounding.   The TAL reporter, by the way, did a credible job of explaining the pro-gun side (although I don’t suspect she understands it all that well).

Worth a listen.

Since You Asked

…the answer to your question is “Correlation doesn’t equal causation – so unless you can find a link between street crime and terrorism, the answer is no”.

Question in response : are precious,  snarky yet deeply insecure pseudointellects from somewhere near Willmar the reason so many people who don’t like Trump are willing to make accomodation with him?

Asking for a friend.

What’s The Fastest Way For An Obscure Republican To Get Famous Instantly?

Republicans aren’t much for celebrity.  We don’t care much about them, and we tend not to be them.     Even among ourselves.

But if you are a Republican – and, redundant to say, obscure – there still are a few ways to become famous.

The big one?   Express any view that is grossly out of whack with society at large, to say nothing of the GOP (which, outside most metro areas, reflects “society at large” pretty completely).

For example, you could be like this fellow in Illinoiis,who is running for. Congress in the greater Chicago area:

Arthur J. Jones, 70, of Lyons, is the lone candidate on the March 20 Republican primary ticket for the seat that includes Western Springs, La Grange and parts of southwestern Chicago. Jones, a former member of the American National Socialist Workers Party, has run for political office several times in the past but has never made it past the primary stage in the 3rd District.

He may get on the ballot as a “Republican” because there’s no other GOP challenger in the Illinois’ stultifyingly blue 3rd District.  The IL GOP has been fighting against the guy for years; I have no idea what the rules are to run as any given party on a ballot in Illinois, and it’s for damn sure the Chicago Tribune isn’t going to explain them; they got their headline:  Holocaust denier likely to appear on ballot for GOP for Chicago-area congressional seat”.

And that’s all that really matters, isn’t it?

Of course, the issue strikes a bit close to home for me; last week, the chairman of the Fourth CD GOP – Republicans in Ramsey and parts of Washington county – made a posting on the district’s Facebook page that went (hold on to your hats, here)  viral – at least among people who are watching an obscure GOP official in an utterly blue district.

Or this fella in Coon Rapids who’s become perhaps the most famous caucus attendee  in Minnesota.

A thousand of us could descend on Cedar Riverside and plaster the place an inch deep in “All People Are Created Equal” flyers and it wouldn’t get a second on the news, anywhere.  And I’m tempted to try it, if only to cover an entire neighborhood in paper.

Misunderestimated

As one who underestimated Donald Trump’s campaign until the moment Wisconsin got called, I’m doing a lot of retroactive learning.

And there are sources to a lot of that in this piece.

Long pullquote:

Some have argued that President Trump’s recent State of the Union speech was designed primarily to troll Democrats. I disagree. The trolling effect (e.g., a steady stream of bad optics televised in prime time—and subsequently easily turned around into an RNC ad—showing Democrats behaving disrespectfully, rolling their eyes, shaking their heads, groaning, looking down at their cell phones, and even walking out in a huff) is real, but was a fully expected side-benefit of the address. No, the President is on something of a John Boyd “Destruction and Creation” mission.

Operating like a general giving the command for his massive political army to advance on the adversary, the State of the Union speech was the best political oration of my lifetime. I’ll try to quickly detail why  by quoting a personal favorite, Richard Fernandez of the Belmont Club. In a piece he wrote in December 2016, just prior to Trump’s inauguration as our 45th President and in the context of Trump’s signaling with respect to what should be our posture with China, Fernandez wrote that:

The Democratic Party should stop underestimating Donald Trump. The good news is that he moves at nongovernment speed. The bad news is that, due to his outsider status, nobody knows exactly where he is going.

Fernandez, like McLaughlin the year before, was noting the uptempo speed of Trump. McLaughlin’s discussion of Trump’s use of the OODA Loop, correctly noted that speed lies at the core of Boyd’s theory of conflict, and has been the most influential element of Boyd’s strategic thinking. Further, “Boyd’s core insight was about the interactive and disruptive nature of speed on human decision-making: success in conflict can be rapid and dramatic if one can “operate inside the OODA Loop” of the opponent.”

When you begin to understand this, you’re well on your way to understanding our 45th president.

The whole thing is worth a read.

Contraindicated

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

When the gun grabbers want to push gun control, they decry 30,000 gun violence deaths per year. But wait, 20,000 of them are old white men committing suicide and 10,000 are young black men killing each other in the hood. The causes are completely different and the cures are therefore different.  One needs mental health intervention, the other needs stop and frisk. You can’t lump them altogether with the one-size-fits-all solution “close the gun show loophole.”
Amnesty advocates for illegal aliens claim there are 11 million living in the shadows. But wait, some were children brought here by their parents (dreamers), some are parents of children born here (anchor babies), some are adults who jumped the border alone (beast train), some had student visas but never went home (9/11 hijackers).   The causes are completely different and therefore the cures are different. Going after visa holders and eliminating chain migration does not eliminate the need for a border wall.  It just means we need to work twice as hard to clean up the entire festering mess.
Build the damned wall.
Joe Doakes

Sometimes, when a family works on its finances, the solutions are “Spend less”, “earn more” or “live on a budget”.  And sometimes the answer is all three.  Stat.  

A Time For Calling BS

This flyer was apparently slipped under peoples’ doors in Cedar Riverside – a Minneapolis neighborhood with a large Somali population – “an hour before the caucuses” this past Tuesday:

Give it a read.

I don’t know about you, but to me it reads like someone who wants to caricature what they think an ignorant Republican might write like (and who perhaps isn’t nearly as literate as they think they are, themselves).

And I’m trying to wrap my heads around the idea of a bunch of (clearly white) bigots running around Cedar Riverside stuffing things “under peoples’ doors”…

…according to the person who posted the offending flyer…:

…who, as luck would have it, just happens to work for a DFL-affiliated Somali community group.

Slipping under doors?  Not distributed at caucus sites?

I dunno.  Seems fishy to me.

UPDATE:   Suffice to say, I have my questions:

Five’ll get you ten I get blocked forthwith.

UPDATE 2:  And one day later, it’s in an Ilhan Omar fundraising letter?   That was quick, verifying it’s not a hoax and all. .

Nothing fishy at all.

 

This is Modern “Feminism”

Former state representative Phyllis Kahn, commenting on Minnesota public radio’s upcoming pledge week:

I, myself, have chosen to remember how Garrison Keillor treated…

… Well, everybody. By all accounts, Keillor was obsequious to those he saw as his “superiors” – presidents, governors (provided they were Democrats) and stars – mildly ingratiating to peers who, in his opinion, could help him, and rude, dismissive and arrogant to those he saw as “below” him. And the legends about him as an employer should follow him into the next life, if there is cosmic justice.

It’s not hard to imagine that Phyllis Kahn believes there is one set of rules for everyone else, and one for the likes of her and Garrison Keillor; she’s the one that used her political clout to Jimmy the Minneapolis city code to ptrvent De La Salle high school from putting up lights at it’s football stadium – to avoid harsh and her nighttime mellow.

Proportion

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

The Dow dropped the most points ever!  Trump should stay away!
Rubbish. The Dow dropped 666 points to close at 25,520.   An article from Obama’s time, 2015, shows the 10 worst drops in history.  His was number 10.
The analysts are using points instead of percentages which makes it sound scary but is it really?  If the Dow was at 10,000 points and dropped 1,000, that’s a 10% drop but if it’s at 20,000 points and drops 1,000, that’s a 5% drop, only half as bad.  Trump’s drop of 666 on 26,000 is 2.5%, not the worst in history, doesn’t even make in the top 10.   It’s a blip.
Why do you suppose an English major can figure that out, but all the sophisticated market analysts in the media cannot?
Joe Doakes

Make no mistake – they can figure it out.

But the Demorat messaging plan is “Say whatever we need to; our audience is either in on the line, or isn’t smart enough to bother”.

Predictable

For a few years, I listened to the NPR comedy game show Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me – a tongue-in-cheek program that features a panel of dubious celebrities answering current-events questions to win prizes for members of the audience.  The host is the razor-sharp Peter Segel.    Sure, the condo prog politics bubbled under the surface; it’s NPR, after all.  But it was generally so good – and so in line with what passes for political comedy these days – that it worked.

But lately – not coincidentally, for the past year and change – Wait Waiot‘s shots at  President Trump have gotten flabby, predictable – really, cringeworthy.  The sound of a staff of writers taking the cheap easy laugh, over and over.

It’s not just obscure radio comedies.  Donald Trump seems to be making comics dumber:

…the Trumpian option in their comedy has rendered [Bill Maher, Steven Colbert, Seth Meyers and others] charmless while strikingly limiting their audiences to those who share their politics. I recently wrote a book on the subject of charm, in preparation for which I asked a great many people to name five persons in public life they thought charming. No one could do it. In a political time as divisive as ours, a public figure loses roughly half his following—and hence his charm—just as soon as he announces his politics. For an entertainer to do so is perhaps even more hazardous.

The whole thing is worth a read.