Today’s News, Ten Years Ago

Bill Kling, the godfather of Minnesota Public Radio as we know it today, was a radio visionary or a skilled political operative who was an expert at marshaling political clout to his ends.

Well, forget the “or”.  He was both.

Kling was much of the reason MPR is what it is today – in terms of creative vision and, especially, “business development” via both conventional fundraising and endowment-mongering, and use of the political system to meet his ends.  He built a huge, successful merchandising arm (based on the success of Garrison Keillor and “Prairie Home Companion”, the lighting in a bottle that made MPR not only big, but phenomenally wealthy); he also led the charge against community low-power FM radio stations – which could have cut into Big Public Radio’s funding and audience – until the Internet rendered the battle moot.  And any time any conservative got any ideas about cutting public funding for MPR, Kling called in enough favors on Capitol Hill to make a Chicago ward heeler dizzy with envy.

And to this radio geek, who spent his formative years working at dusty little small-town stations tucked in above drugstores or behind hardware stores, or places like the old KSTP-AM, wedged into an old transmitter shed, a tour through MPR’s studios on 7th and Robert in Saint Paul – even in their “old” facility – made you feel a little like Jethro Clampett walking through that Beverly Hills mansion for the first time (as did hearing what MPR people got paid; people doing the exact same job I did at KSTP-AM made 50% more than I got).  And when they upgraded it in the mid-aughts, with a huge indoor auditorium and capacious new offices and, best of all, state of the state of the art studios?  Not just exactly at the radio high-tech fashion curve – oh no.  That, plus they had not one but two state of the art on-air studios, mirror images of each other, so that the staff (!) of one show didn’t have to rush and trip over each other to get out of the way of the next show coming in; they’d just alternate studios.

The Taj Ma Kling. Or the “Kling Public Media Center”. Tomayto, Tomahto.

So opulent (to my commercial radio tastes) was it, that ten years ago this past Tuesday, I christened their facility the “Taj Ma Kling“.

And ten years and one day after I named the facility, Minnesota Public Radio in effect agreed with me:

Minnesota Public Radio will rename its St. Paul headquarters and broadcast facilities the Kling Public Media Center on April 19. The decision to do so was actually made back in 2011, the year Kling retired from his post as CEO of both MPR and American Public Media, but the actual change was held off until now so that it coincided with MPR’s 50th anniversary.

““Our 50th anniversary is the perfect time to honor what Bill created and built. His entrepreneurial spirit and passion for public service continue to inspire us as we begin our next 50 years,” said Jon McTaggart, the current president and CEO of American Public Media Group. “What Bill has done – not just for Minnesota and MPR, but for public media audiences across the country – is unique and lasting. The creativity and innovation within the walls of the Kling Public Media Center will always be a living testament to what Bill began a half century ago.”

“Taj Ma Kling” / “Kling Public Media Center”.

Different words,  Same idea.

It’s Time For A Saint Paul-Style, Ballot-Stuffing Vote!

The DFL – the party of plutocrats waving the bloody shirt of poverty – is in the middle of a fundraising drive. I got an email from Ken Martin, the DFL’s chair.

And in exchange for a $5 donation, the donor will get the one thing that seems to make every single liberal’s heart go pitty pat; like a shiny object that doesn’t need polishing; like a squirrel you don’t have to chase.

A bumper sticker.

In this case, a choice of three bumpers stickers – each of which requires a massive suspension of disbelief.

As a public service to my audience, I think it’s time for us to vote on these bumper stickers.

Option #1 – The DFL:  It’s pretty plain-jane and vanilla – not that you can refer to Jane or Vanilla in DFL circles anymore.

It’s the tamer of the three options,, obviously – although it requires enough suspension of disbelief to accept that the Democrats represent labor, much less farmers, in this state anymore.

I’m willing to accept the idea of Mariah Carey undersinging, or Tom Cruise doing a restrained, subdued interview.  But The “FL” in “DFL” is pushing even my tolerance for fancy.

Option #2 – Organize!   This next one is more of a call to action.

It’d have you believe that the Democrat Party is a mass of underdogs that, working together, can take on the big fish, Trump.  :

Of course, to be accurate, you’d need a school of fish bigger than the Trump fish, swimming behind the school of “littlle fish” giving them orders.

Second level of suspended disbelief; the “little fish” form a “Stars and Stripes” pattern.  To be accurate, the fish flag would need to be in flames, set alight by an amorphous group of college age fish.

Option #3 – Resist!:   Finally – not just a call to action, but a call to fiction!

The DFL seems to think that the left is “the resistance”.

No.  They are the establishment.  The millions of Americans who came out to toss the anointed Hillary Clinton out of public life are the resistance.  The Democrat Party is the one being resisted.

Minnesota DFL?  You are the status quo!   This is a blue state!   And as you (plural) proudly say every second odd-numbered year, you “own” Minneapolis and Saint Paul.

You’re not the resistance  You’re the occupier!

Time For Action:   Let’s vote.  The question is, which bumper sticker requires a bigger suspension of disbelief?

Which DFL Bumper Sticker requires a bigger suspension of disbelief?

 
pollcode.com free polls

Operators are standing by.

Civil War

The Democrats nationwide – including here in Minnesota – are as split along rural-urban lines as, well, the rest of the US is.  And that fault line is shaking the endorsement challenge in the Governor’s race in Virginia, where the “progressive”, Northern-Virginia, government-worker set has pretty directly set out to alienate the rural Democrats that used to dominate the party and the state.   The state party “Uninvited” one “Mudcat” Saunders – a Virginia democrat operative and activist who’s served as a go-between among rural and urban Democrat interests – from a lmeeting on…

…well, patching up the rural/urban split:

In short Democrats believe that because of their populous numbers in the urban suburbs in Northern Virginia they don’t need rural voters, nor are they showing any willingness to petition, engage or win them over.

Their beef with him was his unwillingness to vote for Hillary Clinton last year; it doesn’t help that he was pretty outspoken about it.

“They don’t have to. And this is why we are the minority party,” said Dane Strother, a Washington-based Democratic strategist with deep Southern roots, “If we remain uninterested in the rural vote we will remain the minority party.”

Virginia Democrats are in the midst of a civil war that is only getting worse rather than better since the election of Donald J. Trump. Virginia did not go for Trump, but its rural voters, a decent amount of them Democrats, voted decisively for Trump over their party’s nominee, Hillary Clinton.

It’s not just Virginia.  When Collin Peterson finally retires, the 7th CD will not elect another Democrat to Congress for several generations; if Rick Nolan and/or Tim Walz leave office to run for Governor, its entirely possible those districts will go GOP.

And yet the MNDFL – as shown with last week’s teapot-tempest with Rep. Hortman scolding the GOP’s “white males” for sitting out Rena Moran’s speech along with a whole bunch of DFLers – is obsessed with the same social justice fripperies that have led to the slow eradication of the DFL in most of greater Minnesota.

Straws

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

There’s an internet video telling people they must “accept the deed” in order to perfect title to their homes.  Until you accept the deed, you’re merely a tenant at sufferance with no rights.  But once you accept the deed, then you become the assignee of the prior owner’s title, and his prior owner’s title, all the way back to the United States government land grant. That’s important, because original land grants give “allodial title” which is title free from all encumbrances.

 And that means the bank can’t foreclose your mortgage.  It’s not an encumbrance on the land.  You might owe the money on the note, but they can’t use the mortgage to take away your home.

 It’s ridiculous, of course.  Yes, the original land grant was allodial in the sense that it was free of any claims from the federal government.  But once you acquire the land, there’s nothing saying you can’t encumber it yourself by, for example, giving a mortgage to pledge the land as security for a loan.  You gave up the allodial character of the land when you signed the mortgage.

During the foreclosure crisis, we had people showing up at the County Recorder’s office wanting to “accept their deed” so they could stop the foreclosure.  Desperate people grasp at straws, they believe there’s got to be a way to save the house, got to be a form they can file, some legal trickery that will allow them to hang on just a little bit longer and maybe even turn this thing around.

 Speaking of whom . . . .

 Joe Doakes

She’s like “Elmer Gantry” without the style.

Laws, And Facts, Are For Little People

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

Senator Franken sent me his newsletter, which included the announcement that he would vote against President Trump’s nominee for Supreme Court.  The reason: the nominee’s ideology favors big business over ordinary Americans.

The press release explains:  “One of Sen. Franken’s main concerns that he said came out of the confirmation hearings is that Judge Gorsuch has a pattern of putting powerful interests, big business, and giant corporations over the safety and rights of average Americans. In one noteworthy ruling, Judge Gorsuch sided with a trucking business over an imperiled driver. In that case, the driver was stuck in below zero weather with frozen brakes and no heat. Forced to choose between freezing to death or driving an unsafe vehicle and risking public safety, he unhitched his trailer and left it behind in order to get warm. And as a result, his company fired him. When Judge Gorsuch ruled on that case, he sided with the trucking company.”

This quote either displays a shocking depth of ignorance about the American legal system, or a disgusting level of contempt for the intellectual abilities of his constituents.  I’m not sure which is worse.

The point of an impartial judiciary is that it does NOT base rulings on the people involved in the case, but on the law as written by the legislative branch of government.  To do it the other way throws us back to feudal times, when people weren’t treated equally under the law because certain favored groups had special privileges.  When the Declaration says “all men are created equal” it doesn’t mean literally equal – obviously we’re not all the same height or wear the same shoe size – it means they’ll be treated as equals for all legal purposes.  We don’t have a nobility that is exempt from the rules. 

If the law says “it’s okay to fire someone who disobeys a lawful order,” and the company gave him a lawful order to stay with the truck, then his decision to abandon the truck was a firing offense and the company was in the right.  What Senator Franken wants the court to do is re-write the law to add a section that the legislature did not include.  He wants the judge to add a section saying “unless the employee has a good reason not to obey the lawful order.” 

That is NOT the judge’s job.  The judge’s job is to say “Based on these facts and this law, this is the result.”  It might be a stupid law and therefore renders a stupid result, but that’s the legislature’s problem to fix.  The judiciary is not a super-legislature.

I will give him this: adopting Franken’s idea would cut down on a lot of litigation.  When the facts and law don’t matter, only the identity of the parties, there’s no need for a trial and witnesses.  If a property management company brought an eviction action against a single mother based on non-payment of rent, the court could immediately dismiss the case and allow her to live there for free, forever, because in Franken’s world, ordinary American trumps business.   If anybody filed a claim against an insurance company for any reason whatsoever, the claimant automatically would win because in Franken’s world, ordinary American trumps business.  Things would get trickier if a Black lesbian single mother sued a left-handed transgendered illegal immigrant because the victim ranking is constantly shifting:  who is the more victimized person and therefore the more worthy winner? 

True, there would be an economic impact as businesses went bankrupt from meritless lawsuits.  But a lot of lawyers would be freed up from litigation to engage in other worthy efforts, perhaps lobbying for stricter environmental regulations to take farmland out of production or stop the importation of oil and natural gas, things that would help save the planet so future generations of Americans could starve in the dark.

Joe Doakes

It’s good to have goals…

Deep Blue World

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

A woman in Britain spoke an unpleasant truth: feminism has made women worse off.  It’s another example of Berg’s Law: Liberal Policies Destroy Liberal Values.

 She concentrates on the economic effect of women entering the labor force but that’s only the half of it.  Cutting everyone’s wages is bad, of course, but looking around various government offices, I don’t think that’s the worst thing.

 The worst thing is productivity dropped by half, as well.  More people doing less work for less money means work-produced-per-dollar remains constant which looks good on paper but is a massive disaster for management.   

 Focusing performance on time-on-task or units-per-hour is oppressive, patriarchal, and just plain no fun, especially with your co-worker said something that hurt your feelings so you simply can’t bear to work right now; or your kid is sick so you can’t come in today; or you’ll get to my project as soon as you finish texting your friend, or you are certain you have medical reasons why you can’t work even if the doctors are too stupid to figure it out.

 Throw in public sector unions and civil service rules making it impossible to fire slackers and you have a workforce that is hostile to the point of being unmanageable.

 Welcome to the Deep State.

 Joe Doakes

Orwell wasn’t wrong, and he wasn’t even all that far off time-wise.  He just got the degree a little off.

The Club

On Saturday, a rally at the state capitol asked Saint Paul and Ramco authorities to actually enforce the law against the spoiled children of their golf buddies.

Many people at the rally said they were concerned that not prosecuting the protesters would send the message that it’s acceptable to interrupt a peaceful event with noise and violence.

“It disturbs the heck out of me to see we’ve descended into lawlessness,” said James Brunsgaard of Hastings, who said he was sworn at and called a racist during the March 4 rally. “It disturbs me beyond belief.”

Several of the speakers expressed frustration that their event was disrupted, while recent Democratic or liberal-leaning events, like the Jan. 21 Women’s March, were not significantly disturbed.

No, let’s be honest:  we’re frustrated because while we, the good guys, will take a out permits that spell out the rules for where and when we can protest, and still get routinely shouted down and often attacked [1], groups in sync with the DFL’s agenda seem to have carte blanche to do whatever they feel like doing [2] with, as we saw on March 4 (and other instances [1]) no consequences whatsoever.

Why, it’s almost like:

  1. there’s a two-tiered system of “free speech” and “justice” in the Twin Cities, and
  2. they – not just the protesters, but the DFL on the official level – are trying to provoke frustration that breaks out into a fight, which will in turn confirm, finally, the left’s long-standing claim that there’s a frothing undercurrent of violence on the right just dying to erupt.  Any day now.  Honest.  Seriously.

And there’s not a damn thing anyone can do about it!

Here’s the problem:  on the one hand, “democracy” can only survive while people trust government and the “justice” system to be impartial.

On the other hand, the people with the upper hand in the Twin Cities – the DFL establishment – have no interest in democracy.


[1] Attacks on conservatives that I can recall off the top of my head:

  • Protesters shouted down Jeanne Kirkpatrick at the U of M in 1987.
  • The shutting down of conservative speakers at Saint Thomas in the mid-2000s
  • The selective enforcement of rules against protesting, ,applied with strict caprice against pro-life protesters and protesters at the Mexican Consulate, largely ignored against leftist protesters
  • The riots at the RNC in 2008
  • The repeated attacks on Trump supporters in Minneapolis in 2016 and, of course, this past March 4 in Saint Paul.

[2] Protesters on the left, on the other hand, got away with:

  • Closing down I-35 – without a permit.
  • Closing down I94 3-4 times – without a demonstration permit.
  • Closing down Snelling Avenue on the closing Saturday of the MN State Fair in 2015 – without a permit
  • Closing down the Green Line on the opening Sunday of the 2015 football season – without a permit.
  • Staging an un-permitted protest on March 4 for precisely the reason that they issue demonstration permits in the first place – to prevent violent confrontations – without any consequences.

TIme For Some Petty Partisanship

Kevin Williamson in National Review comes perilously close to my riff on people who think being “Moderate” is, itself, a good thing:

Bipartisanship is desirable not because the best course is likely to be found at the midpoint between two extremes: The man who drinks to excess every day is a drunk, and so is the man who does so every other day. There is no compromise between fidelity and infidelity. When presented with a good idea and a bad one, there is no point in being a little bit stupid for the sake of compromise.

Which is a lot like my saying: “Moderation for its own sake is like getting a choice between ‘being beaten to death with a baseball bat, and living a long happy life’, and compromising on a traumatic brain injury”.

But he actually has a serious point.   It is high time the GOP descended into some petty partisanship by stopping the petty graft gravy trail that funds the institutional left.

Congress should also target grants and other federal funding directed to political organizations. For example: La Raza, through its banking operations (of course it has banking operations!) has received millions of dollars in federal subsidies…the comptroller general has found routine violations of existing laws against using federal funds for political advocacy and lobbying activities. There is in fact a federal criminal law against using federal appropriations to underwrite lobbying. You will not be surprised to learn that this law — which has been on the books for nearly a century — apparently never has been enforced. “The exact parameters of this law, adopted in 1919, are not precisely known,” writes the Congressional Research Service, “as there appears never to have been an enforcement action or indictment returned based on the provision.” Time to tighten that up. Congress should also adopt a general prohibition on distributing federal settlement funds to nonprofit organizations. Billions of dollars in federal settlements have been directed to “non-victim entities” such as the Urban League and La Raza, which are fundamentally political organizations. If Republicans cannot bring themselves to act out of prudence and principle, then they at least ought to have a sense of self-preservation sufficient to stop funding campaigns against themselves.

It’s time for Republicans to stop letting our sense of fair play be used against us.

Anyway – it verges on a Berg’s Seventh Law reference; for all the left barbers about tax dollars going to support any institution of faith, an insane amount of our money goes to support the left’s religion – leftist power politics (emphasis added):

The Left has a weakness: It is dependent upon government money. It has long accepted that arrangement complacently, on the theory that its friends will generally control the government, if not always at the elected level then at the administrative and bureaucratic level. (The Left has not been wrong about that.) According to the Congressional Budget Office, about 17 percent of all federal outlays take the form of assistance to state and local governments — funds that in turn account for about a quarter of all state and local government spending. A fair portion of that money ends up simply passing through to nonprofits and politically connected contractors who provide dubious “outreach” and “development” services.

The correct term for that is “Graft”.

“Wiretapping”

“The press takes [Trump] literally, but not seriously; his supporters take him seriously, but not literally.
”  — Salena Zito

When Donald Trump claimed “Trump Tower had been wiretapped”, the media – awash in images of sweaty, donut-dust-stained cops hunched over in a 1974 Ford Econoline amid amplifiers and reel to reel tape decks, concentrating on conversations through headphones.  And they laughed – nobody’s done that since the ’80s!  Har di har!

Roger Simon connects some  dots – inconvenient ones, for the agenda-driven media:

What appears at this writing is that Trump transition team members and possibly Trump himself had their identities revealed, were “unmasked” in the parlance, while foreign diplomats were being surveilled. The identities of American citizens were not sufficiently “minimized,” as they are required to be by law. This is a crime one would assume would put the perpetrators in prison. So far it hasn’t. More than that, such behavior is a grave threat to a free society, to all of us.

In effect, Trump was wiretapped — if not in the corny, old sense of the word, something very close. Technologically, he was wiretapped, as were several (actually many) others.

A fair amount of this happened not long before Barack Obama suddenly changed the rules regarding raw intelligence, for the first time ever allowing the NSA to share its data with 16 other intelligence agencies, thus making the dissemination of said data (i. e. leaking) many times more likely. That was done on January 12, 2017, just three scant days before Trump’s inauguration. Why did the then president finally decide to make that particular change at that extremely late date, rather than on one of the previous seven years and three hundred fifty-three days of his presidency? You don’t have to be Sherlock Holmes or Watson to smell a rat. Something’s rotten somewhere — and it’s not Denmark.

The whole thing is worth a read.

Perverse Disincentives

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

Big headlines, Trump is bad for the industry, profits are way down from what they were under Obama, jobs threatened.

 Which industry?  The gun industry.  Obama was its greatest salesman.  Under Trump, the gun industry is crashing.

 Fewer gun sales means fewer guns on the street which, as every Liberal knows, means less crime, less domestic violence, fewer dead children, fewer animals suffering lead poisoning . . . Trump has accomplished more in eight weeks than Obama accomplished in eight years, so why isn’t Trump getting more credit from Liberals?

 Joe Doakes

Consistency isn’t their long suit.

Paging Alanis Morisette, Part CLXXVII

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

I read a good quip the other day:

 Obama policies kill Obama values: if you dither and appease while Russia turns Syria into a charnel house, your commitment to humane treatment of refugees will collapse under the human catastrophe resulting from your fecklessness.

 Okay, technically it’s not true.  Obama’s policies were expressly designed to fundamentally transform America from the nation I grew up loving into a generic second-tier former imperial power like England, France, Spain or Italy.  Sadly, he largely succeeded.

 But the quip works if you replace “Obama” with “Liberal” because then you get:  “Liberal policies kill Liberal values.”

 Welfare intended to help families, disintegrated families.  

 Student loans intended to create an educated populace where students succeed, leave students ignorant and bankrupt.

 Obamacare intended to make health insurance affordable, made it unaffordable.

 Holy cow – this could become another Berg’s Law.

 Joe Doakes

I have a hunch it’s going to be a big year for Berg’s Laws – old and new.

Shot In The Dark: Today’s Learned Opinion, 11 Years Ago

Kurt Schlichter notes that “You Can Tell What Leftists Are Doing By What They Accuse Conservatives Of Doing

Sound familiar?  Of course it does.

This was codified in 2006, in “Berg’s Seventh Law of Liberal Projection“. To wit: “When a Liberal issues a group defamation or assault on conservatives’ ethics, character, humanity or respect for liberty or the truth, they are at best projecting, and at worst drawing attention away from their own misdeeds.”

I’ve collected a few thousand examples over the past 11 years.

To paraphrase the immortal John McClain, “Welcome to the party, Schlichter”.

(But read Schlichter anyway.  He’s one of the best). \

Leftist Justice – Saint Paul Style

Last weekend, a group of “anarchists” attacked a pro-Trump rally at the Minnesota State Capitol.    Thugs wearing helmets and masks sucker-punched and kicked unsuspecting peaceful demonstrators, and in one case sprayed mace into a crowd of people.

It was not a spontaneous event; they were quite obviously organized, equipped, and had planned for the event.

They sprayed what was described as “Bear Mace” into a crowd of unsuspecting people – which can easily be a lethal weapon for people with respiratory conditions.   There were six arrests.

The entire fracas was caught on film, in front of dozens of witnesses.  There is not problem showing the violence, brutality and intent of the event.

No matter.  They are aligned with the left against the right.  And in Saint Paul, that’s license to block streets, clog freeways…

…and now, to physically attack people with potentially lethal force.   Ramsey County has declined to charge the arrested protesters – four boys and two girls – with anything.

Monday, the Ramsey County Attorney’s Office said there were insufficient facts to prove felony-level riot. The attorney’s office said State Patrol has presented the case to the St. Paul City Attorney’s Office for consideration of misdemeanor charges.

That is bullshit, stacked high and deep.

If it were a bunch of rednecks from Isanti County who’d maced the “Womens’ March” a couple weeks ago, they’d still be in jail.

Look at the boys and girls who were arrested.  Check out the names:  Anton.  Isabell.  Linwood.  Those are upper-middle-class white kid names.  Breck School names.  Names that drive Subarus until they get a Volvo.  Names like the children of John Choi’s law school classmates and Chris Coleman’s Crocus Hill and Kenwood cronies have.

It’s the special, deluxe, “for progressives only” justice, part of the “progressives only” school, university, public sector union and non-profit parallel universe of power and privilege that the Big Left in Minnesota gets.

UPDATE:  I’ve seen reports that Linwood Kaine is the son of Hillary Clinton’s VP candidate.

Well, I’m gonna guess there were some lawyers involved, huh?

Symptom Of A Completely Screwed Nation

Wednesday night on national public radio, I listened to Illinois senator Dick “Turban” Durbin respond to President Trump State of the Union address.

Asked about the Democrat response to republican healthcare initiatives – in this case, the proposal to allow people to buy insurance across state lines – his response was:

“Come on. You think people are going to go to a hospital or a doctor in another state?”

And sure enough, you can see Democrats repeating this on social media today.

Do they not see the difference between “health insurance” and “healthcare”?

It Works In So Many Ways

While it’s not statutorily legal, even under the French legal system, I love this idea on so many levels.

The caption, “Oui On Peut”, is French for “Sure, what the hell, it’s not the dumbest idea to come out of the French left in the past sixty years”. Seriously.

American liberals would reflexively attack anyone who claimed He wasn’t actually born in France as a racist.

And John F. Kerry, stricken with jealousy, would no doubt leave the country to run against him.

It’s A Start

Ted Mondale and Michelle Kelm-Helgen resigned from the Metro Sports Utilities Commission yesterday, after the corruption in the MSFC’s use of luxury skyboxes as a spiff for the Twin Cities’ DFL became to great for even the Metro old-boy-and-girl network to hush up.

Mondale and Kelm-Helgen faced cascading criticism and scrutiny since the Star Tribune reported in November that they and other MSFA commissioners hosted friends, family and well-connected DFLers at two 18-person luxury suites at the stadium during Vikings games and at several concerts. The two said the state-owned suites were needed to market the building, but an investigation by Legislative Auditor James Nobles revealed the suites were used mostly for entertainment by the MSFA commissioners and staff.

The Legislative Auditors report sounds like it’s good reading:

[Legislative Auditor James Nobles’] 100-page report faulted Kelm-Helgen and Mondale’s leadership of the MSFA, saying they had violated a core ethical principle by using public office for personal gain, by handing out free tickets, VIP parking, food and drink to friends and allies.

Combined, the two made nearly $300,000 in taxpayer-funded salaries. They oversaw construction of the $1.1 billion stadium, which was funded in part with a $498 million public subsidy.

And the saga of Michelle Kelm-Helgen, DFL grandée extraordinaire,  sounds like a “how-to” for any political glad-hander in a one-party city;

Even before the suite usage blew up, an unclear division of duties between Mondale and Kelm-Helgen became an issue. Former authority members Duane Benson and John Griffith had questioned the need for two taxpayer-funded executives in similar roles. They also raised concerns about Kelm-Helgen’s lack of collaboration.

“We were on a board that had an inability to get information,” Benson said, adding that Kelm-Helgen also refused to let the board participate in her job reviews.

Remember way back when Zygi Wilf was yanking the DFL-led Legislature and Governor Flint-Smith Dayton around, threatening to move the team if the state didn’t pony up to improve his investment for him at public expense?  And we asked – what could possibly go wrong when you entrust half a billion dollars to an bunch of unaccountable bureaucrats whose sole qualification was their DFL political connection?

Because you should remember it.

The Right Women

One of my favorite sociopolitical tales is that of Alan Dershowitz, the not-remotely-conservative legal scholar who once castigated the faculty of Harvard Law School for seeing diversity as “someone with different color skin, than you, or wearing a skirt, who thinks exactly the same as you do”.

As predicted, the “Womens March” over the weekend, in DC and Saint Paul, was precisely that.

Continue reading

All Roads Lead To George

The more politics I watch, the more I realize Berg’s Seventh Law – which started as a flippant observation of casual hypocrisy…:

“When a Liberal issues a group defamation or assault on conservatives’ ethics, character, humanity or respect for liberty or the truth, they are at best projecting, and at worst drawing attention away from their own misdeeds”

…truly does pretty much explain the entire American left.

To wit:  the left is barbering about the suffocating control an Eastern European kleptocrat has over the American right?  Look for an Eastern European kleptocrat pulling the strings behind the American left.

Ding ding di freaking ding:

By my draft research, which I’m opening up for crowd-sourcing on GoogleDocs, Soros has funded, or has close relationships with, at least 56 of the march’s “partners,” including “key partners” Planned Parenthood, which opposes Trump’s anti-abortion policy, and the National Resource Defense Council, which opposes Trump’s environmental policies. The other Soros ties with “Women’s March” organizations include the partisan MoveOn.org (which was fiercely pro-Clinton), the National Action Network (which has a former executive director lauded by Obama senior advisor Valerie Jarrett as “a leader of tomorrow” as a march co-chair and another official as “the head of logistics”). Other Soros grantees who are “partners” in the march are the American Civil Liberties Union, Center for Constitutional Rights, Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch. March organizers and the organizations identified here haven’t yet returned queries for comment.   

Presumably because they’re jetting off to Riyadh to protest treatment of women in the Middle East.

Oh, I slay me.