Sick Of It All

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

The Legislature is considering government-funded sick leave.  The legislation is incredibly complex and detailed but this is the first I’ve heard of it.
Where’d the proposal come from?  Did an advocacy group assist in drafting it?  Who?  I seem to recall Democrats fuming because the American Legislative Exchange Council had assisted with legislation.  Who assisted with this legislation?
Aside from that, I wonder about the public policy implications.  If the government will pay my sick leave, what incentive does my employer have to offer sick leave?  None, of course.  Will this legislation cause employers to abolish sick leave the way Obama Care caused employers to abolish health insurance benefits?

Of course it will.

And administering the program will create yet more jobs for the political class, serving as a transfer of wealth from taxpayers to them.

Yet again.

Unexpected

Price hikes brought about by New York City’s new $15 minimum wage are causing some consumer heartburn.

Unexpectedly:

Some New Yorkers are displeased with one of the more predictable outcomes of a $15 minimum wage—restaurants all over the city are raising their prices, according to the New York Post.

The city’s minimum wage went up to $15 from $13 or $13.50 at the beginning of 2019, boosting the paychecks for numerous lower-wage workers.
Those who rely on restaurants regularly for their daily lunches, however, aren’t as happy.
“It’s obnoxious—kind of a slap in the face,” Starbucks patron Edward Beck told the Post. “Another increase, and I won’t come back.”
Restaurants are raising prices to adjust for the higher salaries they must pay workers. But, they’re increasingly worried about discouraging customers with too-high prices.
“[Restaurants] feel they’re getting to a point where the customer might reject the higher prices, choose a different way to eat out, or eat their own food,” said Melissa Fleischut, president and CEO of the New York State Restaurant Association.

“But…but, it’s from The Blaze! Your source has a point of view, and therefore is invalid!”

The same precise story is behind the lines of this story from that noted conservative tool, the Star Tribune, from last year; a local restaurant mainstay is losing customers, price point and restaurant jobs due in large part to all that social justice they’re paying for.

Cold

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

Not only are electric cars mere displacement vehicles (they run on electricity generated by burning coal instead of running on gasoline so they still pollute, they simply displace the pollution to Monticello instead of Como Park), now we learn they aren’t capable of driving to Monticello and back if the weather is cold.
But not to fear.  Rep. Ilhan is working on raising your taxes to force more of us to drive less.  It’s her “stay at home and watch TV all day” doctrine.  Looking at the snow falling again this morning, actually, I’m kind of on board with that.

That’s what they’re counting on.

New York State Of Mind

Last year, we talked about Minneapolis “it” restaurant Hell’s Kitchen which, after years of virtue-signaling its approval for things like mandatory #FightFor15 minimum wage hikes and compulsory sick time, had had to eliminate the equivalent of five full-time, $15/hour jobs – partly due to bad management, partly due to hikes in bottom-line expenses, and partly due to bad management encouraging the hikes to bottom line expenses.

It’s not just Minneapolis. New York City restaurants are taking it right in the blintz:

New York City Hospitality Alliance survey of 574 restaurants showed that 75 percent of full-service restaurants reported plans to reduce employee hours this year in response to the latest mandated wage increase. Another 47 percent said they would eliminate jobs in 2019. Eighty-seven percent of respondents also said they would increase menu prices this year.
These types of cost-cutting moves coincide with a U.S. Labor Department report released last Friday showing full-service restaurants in December raised prices the most since 2011, to cover soaring labor and food costs.
“The money has to come from somewhere, and we found that unfortunately, as a result, businesses are making some really tough decisions which don’t only impact them, but have a negative impact on their workers as well as their diners, too,” said Andrew Rigie, executive director of the New York City Hospitality Alliance, which represents restaurants and nightlife venues throughout the five boroughs.
But shaving workers’ hours and killing jobs limits restaurateurs’ ability to offer employees opportunities for growth and development. It also can kill owners hopes of offering a fine-dining experience that delivers both good food and good service.  

Let them eat platitudes!

Unexpectedly

After eight years of DFL-led bureaucratic governance and repeated ta hikes, the city of  Luverne was shocked, shocked, to find that a company decided to ditch a deal and move their expansion to South Dakota:

With groundbreaking expected this summer at the Luverne site, Tru Shrimp executives said they recently discovered a state environmental rule about water discharge that could delay construction of the facility, which it calls a harbor, by one to three years.

“Our timeline is to build a harbor in 2019,” Michael Ziebell, chief executive of Tru Shrimp, said in an interview Tuesday. With investors’ money on the line, the company couldn’t afford to wait for the discharge issue to be resolved, he said.

Unexpectedly!

The board of the Balaton, Minn.-based firm in November gave final approval for the $45 million facility on 67 acres just outside Luverne. The state of Minnesota had invested nearly $2 million to build roads and utilities to the site and Luverne, a city of about 5,000 residents, invested $600,000 in the effort.

“I’m not going to kid you, it was like a gut shot and we were blindsided by it,” Luverne Mayor Pat Baustian said. “I understand it was a business decision and they’ve got to do what they’ve got to do, but we had no previous interaction with Tru Shrimp that suggested the regulatory issue was going to be a real problem.”

Nobody expects the Minnesota regulatory inquisition!

Sharing Democracy With The Depraved

Rep Steve Scalise – who’s had more, closer contact with the depravity of the hard left than most anyone – has had enough with Alexandra Ocasio Cortez’ supporters:


There are times when I wonder why this country even tries to maintain a “union”.

Marginal Knowledge

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

The New Hotness wants higher income tax rates.  The Left says it’s sensible and there’s historical precedent.
The trouble with historical precedent is picking the right precedent.  College students who drink until they vomit could point to Rome, the pinnacle of civilization at the time, where vomitoria were provided in public entertainment venues.  So that makes it alright?   No.
Similarly, picking a time when America was the world economic superpower and capital investment had nowhere else to go, doesn’t mean that high earners today would find their wages captured by higher tax rates.  Rich people are rich, they’re not stupid.  They can move to low-tax venues.  They can shelter their incomes.  They can lobby for loopholes that only they can afford. 
The only way to ensure that everybody pays their “fair share” is to fully embrace Communism:  from each according to his ability, to each according to his need.  But getting ordinary people into that mental state will require a period of socialization, during which the recalcitrant, deplorable, bitter clingers are identified and sent for re-education in the far North, or sent to farm the land by hand, or buried in mass graves.  And who will decide who lives and who dies? 

But the fact that it used to be the status quo back when the US was the world’s only functional economy (with ample tax shelters provided for the fabulously wealthy, like Ocasio Cortez’s benefactors) makes it “moderate”, to Big Left.

Birds Of A Feather

I don’t believe in “guilt by association”.

On the other hand, I can sense that an off a lot of Democrats, especially in the Twin Cities, are not going to be especially mortified by this development – which would have been considered comical 30, to say nothing of 60 years ago:

published his essay last week at People’s World, a “daily news website of, for and by the 99% and the direct descendant of the Daily Worker.”” data-reactid=”23″ style=”margin: 0px 0px 1em; caret-color: rgb(38, 40, 42); color: rgb(38, 40, 42); font-family: “Helvetica Neue”, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 15px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.301961); -webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration: none”>

Communist Party chairman John Bachtell published his essay last week at People’s World, a “daily news website of, for and by the 99% and the direct descendant of the Daily Worker.”

“[L]abor and other key social forces are not about to leave the Democratic Party anytime soon,” Bachtell promised. “They still see Democrats as the most realistic electoral vehicle” to fight against perceived class enemies.

Bachtell, 58, is playing the long political game and he has a strategy, he said.

“First, we are part of building the broadest anti-ultra right alliance possible, uniting the widest array of class (including a section of monopoly), social and democratic forces. This necessarily means working with the Democratic Party,” the communist leader explained.

“Second, our objective is not to build the Democratic Party. At this stage we are about building the broad people’s movement led by labor that utilizes the vehicle of the Democratic Party to advance its agenda,” Bachtell further expounded. “We are about building the movements around the issues roiling wide sections of people that can help shape election contours and debates.”

“[W]e are for building movements in the electoral arena and see engagement in the electoral arena and democratic governance as a vital means to further build movements,” Bachtell also said.

But don’t you dare say the Democratic Party has moved to the left!

Better Than To Receive?

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

Got this in the mail.  Not going.  Annoying.

 

“Give back.”  To whom, the beneficiaries of this fundraiser?  The county bar association and the local Legal Aid office?  The phrase ‘give back’ implies I once received something of value from them, for which I did not pay on the spot.  The phrase ‘give back’ implies an obligation, a debt.  Searching my memory (insert Star Trek computer voice: “Working. Working.”).  Nope, can’t think of anything either of them ever gave me for free.  Don’t see that I have any obligation to give either of them anything in return.

“Pay it Forward.”  Cute movie, silly slogan, worse reasoning.  Somebody once did something nice for me, so that burdens me with an obligation to give money to someone else.  And lucky for me, they’ve pre-selected the people I’ll be paying, all good Liberal Democrats, no doubt.  At $85 a plate, plus having to sit through do-gooders giving each other feel-good awards to signal their virtue?  I don’t think so.  If that’s the cost of people doing nice things for me, stop doing nice things for me, I can’t afford it.

This is not an appeal for charity, it’s shaming.  I’ve been shamed enough.  I get it every day.  I’m an old White male.  We’re the bane of society.  Racists.  Sexists.  Rapists.  We didn’t build anything, we never accomplished anything, we’re oppressors who stole our ill-gotten gains and don’t deserve to keep them.  So Give Back the money or Pay it Forward to our pet programs so we can work to further shame old White men.

You know what?  That argument doesn’t motivate me to give money, doesn’t inspire my generosity.

If you want me to give you money, convince me you deserve it.  Offer programs I want to watch (Dr. Who on public television).  Give me something I want to have (salvation, from my church).  Show me you’re helping people I want to help and give me a little reward (Girl Scout cookies).  Hell, stand at the stoplight in the pouring rain holding a cardboard sign to make me feel glad I’m not you.  I keep a dozen ones in the center console for precisely those people.  But not for Legal Aid lawyers.  And not because I’ve got some fake obligation that I should be ashamed I haven’t paid.

The hardest part of establishing an entitlement is convincing those who’ll pay that you are in fact entitled to their money.

It seems MN Democrats have done a fine job of this.

 

The Racket Strikes Back

A friend of the blog writes:

It used to be people would go out for a night of fun and one person would have to be the designated driver. A majority didn’t even think to use cabs and public transit would often not run regularly enough at bar close.

Now that we have Uber and Lyft, I have heard many, many stories of people using those services when going out. I know some people who no longer drive under the influence because of the affordability of Uber.

So, of course, when people get real options that are reliable and affordable, those in the government who think their jobs are as social engineers have a problem.

Of interest locally, I found this link through a Tweet that declared Minneapolis/St Paul should consider this next. Why?

They can try to limit all they want, but there will still be people in cars and ride sharing will still happen. For example, the other day, I was approached by a man on the street who was trying to start his own ride share business, offering lower rates than Uber by about $2. I also have the number of a taxi driver who moonlights as a personal driver for those of us with his business card. He pretty much places himself on call for us.

So, yes, there will be options, which makes it even more aggravating that city governments get involved in private business that actually works for the people.

In a system built on rent-seeking, people will seek rent.

And for the government permission racket to survive, it’s gotta deliver the rent.

Dear Democrats

Remember when Donald Trump was Literally Hitler for his treatment of the media?

No, I didn’t think you would:

Democratic socialist House candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez banned reporters from attending several of her public town hall events this week.

Ocasio-Cortez, who shocked the political world by defeating Rep. Joe Crowley (D–N.Y.) in June’s Democratic primary, held sessions with constituents of New York’s 14th Congressional District on Sunday and Wednesday. But while she tweeted out some details about the town halls, she didn’t let members of the media attend in person, according to the Queens Chronicle.

The candidate’s campaign manager, Vigie Ramos Rio, tells the Chronicle the ban was implemented after reporters “mobbed” her last week following a community meeting. The campaign had apparently made it clear there would be “no Q&A and no one-on-one [interviews].”

If it weren’t for double standards…

…well, you know how it goes.

Orwell Was A Pollyanna

Ben Shapiro challenged prog flavor of the month Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez to a debate – something she’s never had in her “political career”.

Now, there’s no requirement that a pol debate anyone, ever – even their opponents for office, much less pundits.   Of course, it can be used against you – not that it matters in a one-party town like Ocasio-Cortez’ district.

And there are so many ways to decline a debate request like this:

  • “Sorry – I’m getting ready for a general election (coronation?), and I’m too busy”.
  • “Debating you will be of no consequence to serving (koff koff) my constituents and my district.  Why would either of us waste our time?”
  • “I’ve got drapes to measure that evening”
  • “I gotta wash my hair”.
  • Or the old reliable “<silence>”.

That’s not what Ocasio-Cortez did, though:

Asking for a debate is “like catcalling” – sexist, intrusive, unwanted, arrogant.

A response that is, itself, sexist and arrogant, and a sign of a mind that can think on no other plane than the politics of identity and outrage.

Congratuations, New York.  You got another winner here.  (Not that Minnesota has anything to brag about, since the equally risible Alondra Cano  Alondra Cano, Ray Dehn and Keith Ellison remain in office).

SIDE NOTE:   Remember when the same people who are raving about Ocasio-Cortez today were calling Sarah Palin  an ignorant dumbass?

This is the sound of “the bar” in freefall.

Of Pikers And Pimps

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

St. Paul and Minneapolis are considering raising the minimum wage to $15 per hour.  There are no studies on the effect of a $15 per hour minimum wage because it’s never been that high.  The studies of effects of prior minimum wage increases go both ways, depending on who you believe.  What to do?

This is where it helps to be conservative, because we have principles to guide our actions, not just feelings.  One principle is:  “There’s no such thing as a free lunch.”  Another is:  “Don’t tear down a fence until you know why it was built.”  The core thought underlying these principles is to make changes cautiously, only when you’re certain they won’t cause more harm than good.  Since the evidence is equivocal, adherence to conservative principles would dictate that we not raise the minimum wage to $15.

But Democrats are not conservatives so they have no such principles to restrain them.  They’re going to raise it because it will please the mob and that’s the most important thing to them.  So if you’re going to raise it despite the evidence, why stop at $15?  Why not raise it to $100 per hour and we’ll all be rich?  Pikers.

Power is the principle.

If You Think Movies Are Expensive Now, Wait Until They’re Free

MoviePass is a particularly dimwitted startup – it sells, basically, transit cards to movies, in theaters, allowing people admittance to movies per month, which in the age of Netflix and Hulu seems a bit like selling season tickets to Jesse Ventura’s old Indoor Football league.

As one might expect, the company – which seems a throwback to the sort of startups that glutted the market and popular culture during the DotBomb era, before 9/11 – is teetering on the brink of bankruptcy.

Which has led to one of the most brilliant – dare I say, Onion-like – bits of satire I’ve ever read:

We should let the privately owned MoviePass die, so a nationalized, public MoviePass can live.

Read the whole hilarious thing.

I’m already picturing Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez or Amy Klobuchar or Maxine Waters or Ilhan Omar solemnly testifying before Congress about the moral imperative for the Federal Government…

…to transfer tax dollars to Hollywood.

Brilliant, brilliant satire.

UPDATE:   It just occured to me – what if the writer wasn’t being satirical?

 

 

A Preponderance Of Evidence

New York’s new $15 minimum wage and mandatory leave benefits – dutifully parroted by Minneapolis and Saint Paul – are already having…

…well, exactly the effect conservatives predicted:

In explaining his decision to close following 28 years of high-volume business, owner Charles Milite told the New York Post, “The times have changed in our industry. The rents are very high and now the minimum wage is going up and we have a huge number of employees.”

Milite employs about 150 people at his breakfast, lunch, and dinner operation, which also puts him over the Affordable Care Act’s costly mandate that establishments with 50 or more employees provide health insurance.

The Coffee Shop is part of The Gotham City Restaurant Group, which also owns Flats Fix, the former employer of socialist darling Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. The 28-year-old Democratic congressional candidate recently told The New York Times that many of her fellow restaurant workers were uninsured, inspiring her to run for office.

And the inevitable end result?

Eventually, minimum wage laws and other prohibitive regulations will cause the world-renowned restaurant life in cities like New York, DC, and San Francisco to cease to exist. The staff skill levels will drop, the number of servers and bartenders will never be enough, and the only survivors will be fast-casual chains with low overhead and deep pockets.

New York’s new look will be vacant storefronts between an occasional Pret-a-Manger or the public restroom formerly known as Starbucks. But don’t worry. That charming, downtown studio apartment will still run about $5,000 per month for the privilege of proximity to all that culture.

Minneapolis and Saint Paul’s efforts to be little New Yorks will no doubt pay off – in all the wrong ways.

 

A Cold Caracas

Where San Francisco has gone – a hideously expensive city with plummeting quality of life – New York will soon follow:

Beautiful, hilly San Francisco has become known as the city where 20 pounds of poop were dumped on a sidewalk last week in a clear bag and remained there for hours. As The Post noted, “human waste-related complaints in San Francisco have skyrocketed 400 percent from 2008 to 2018,” and “In 2017 alone, more than 21,000 reports were received.”

What happened in San Francisco is obvious. It stopped prosecuting quality-of-life offenses and, unsurprisingly, the quality of life for the city’s residents and visitors decreased sharply.

In 2015, San Francisco courts stopped enforcing bench warrants for such offenses. Police continued writing up tickets for public drunkenness or sleeping in parks, but when the accused failed to show up to their court appearance a judge simply dismissed the outstanding warrant.

New York started following San Francisco’s lead in 2016 when Manhattan DA Cyrus Vance Jr. announced his office would no longer be prosecuting offenses such as public urination. Both cities have accepted that they’ll continue to have a large number of people living on their streets and inevitably using their sidewalks as a toilet.

Progressivism is all about leveling the world out (outside the parts where the kommissars life, anyway); logically, eventually, “leveled out” has to include “…to the level of public rest room”.

Although as Ed Driscoll notes, at least some people are getting their wish:

But as Dan Henninger of the Wall Street Journal warned in 2005, hipsters lamented the loss of the gritty Death Wish/Panic in Needle Park-era Manhattan of the 1970s — and thanks to Mayor de Blasio, they’re getting that city back once again. Good and hard, as Mencken would say.

And since Minneapolis is following the same route – obsessing over virtue-signaling while ignoring quality of life issues – how long until Minneapolis follows suit?

Demographics

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

Residents are fleeing these cities.  USA Today says it’s people retiring and moving South, a trend that began decades ago, was interrupted by the Crash and now is resuming.

Really? Why are Mobile and Montgomery, Alabama on the list?  Why are Jacksonville and Fayetteville, North Carolina on the list?  Why is Sierra Vista-Douglas, Arizona on the list – that’s a stone’s throw from the border with Mexico, state income tax is 5%, ought to be a retiree paradise.  Brownsville-Harlingen, Texas?  Brownsville is farther south than Arizona and therefore warmer and Texas has no income tax.  Why would sun-seekers be leaving those areas?  They should be flocking there.

Notice which cities people are not fleeing but instead are the fastest-growing?  Boise, Idaho is #1 and Seattle, Washington is #2, ahead of Texas and Florida.  Portland, Oregon is #17, Colorado Springs is 18, Salt Lake City is 24.  These are not snowbird destinations.  Why are they growing?

The climate explanation doesn’t make sense.  Try this one instead:  the cities people flee are decaying because leftists in charge have destroyed them by pandering to residents who lack the old-fashioned values that were required to take care of a community.  Refugees.  Illegals.  Homeless.  Welfare mindset regardless of welfare status – people who expect everything provided for free without lifting a finger.

When your city intentionally sets out to replace the 1950’s nuclear family post-war community with an Obama-era refugee/illegal/welfare community, don’t act all surprised when the 1950’s people move out.  Nobody wants to move from safe, clean Roseville to narco-terrorist infested Brownsville or poop-on-the-streets San Francisco, regardless of the year-round climate.

Joe Doakes

If we just give sclerotic big-city liberal adminstrations enough time, it’ll all work out…

It’s Almost, But Not Quite, A Berg’s Law

It probably doesn’t qualify as a “Berg’s Law” because it may not be absolute and universal – but for the most part, if you scratch the surface of an American “Democratic Socialist”, you’ll find a rich kid with daddy issues.

So, it seems, with current socialist wunderkind Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.  Last week’s big primary winner in a Congressional district that includes parts of the Bronx and Queens highlighted the 29 year old “community organizer”, who will likely be going to Congress, and her “Jenny from the Block” story.  Listening to her before the election, I caught myself humming “It’s A Hard Knock Life” more than a few times.

So was it baked wind?

What do you think?  Remember – it’s almost a Berg’s Law:

Around the age of five, Alexandria’s architect father Sergio Ocasio moved the family from the “planned community” of Parkchester in the Bronx to a home in Yorktown Heights, a wealthy suburb in Westchester County. The New York Times describes her childhood home as “a modest two-bedroom house on a quiet street.” In a 1999 profile of the area, when Ocasio-Cortez would have been ten years old, the Times lauded Yorktown Heights’ “diversity of housing in a scenic setting” – complete with two golf courses.

Westchester County – which the Washington Post, in a glowing profile on Ocasio-Cortez, describes as only “middle class” – ranks #8 in the nation for the counties with the “highest average incomes among the wealthiest one percent of residents.” According to the Economic Policy Institute, the county’s average annual income of the top one percent is a staggering $4,326,049.

Yorktown Heights, specifically, offers a sharp contrast from Bronx living. According to USA.com, the town’s population is 81 percent white, and median household income is $96,413 – nearly double the average for both New York state and the nation, according to data from 2010-2014.

I interviewed for a job in Westchester County thirty years ago; the program director basically told me there was no way I could live in the area on what they could payme (here was the story).

Not that there’s anything wrong with doing well; but not only didn’t Ocasio-Cortez earn it, she wants to make it harder for others to do it.

(Even as she, beyond a doubt, gets ready to make a couple million in honoraria from liberals with deep pockets over the next few years, much like the Bern she no doubt felt).

Open Letter To Tim Walz

To:  Represenative Tim Walz
From:  Mitch Berg, Ornery Peasant
Re:  Sell Sell Sell

Rep. Walz,

You’re running in a primary this fall against a dog’s breakfast of people who, notwithstanding your attempt to re-paint yourself as a “progressive”, are far, far to your left.

To your credit, you’ve taken that “re-painting” pretty seriously:

Rep. Walz, burning whatever cred he may have had with gun owners by french-kissing “Moms Want Action” in 2016.

But your fellow DFLers prefer their “Democratic Socialism” neat.  No ice.

And apparently, with a little communist chaser.

For years, I’ve heard my Democrat friends chanting “Ronald Reagan wouldn’t get endorsed by today’s GOP” – with the premise being Reagan was “too centrist” for today’s GOP . It’s a perfectly plausible claim, if you have no idea about the history of the GOP; go and google “A Time For Choosing”, the full hour-long speech, if you need proof; it’d fit in at any Tea Party meeting in the past decade. If anything, Reagan would still scare the DC establishment; George Will was deeply unhappy with Reagan’s performance, and we know what George has been up to lately.

So no – Reagan would *not* have trouble in today’s GOP, or at least the part of the party that swept the elections in 2010 and 2014.

But Paul Wellstone and Hubert Humphrey would get laughed out of today’s Democratic Party. Of that, there can be no doubt.

That is all.

Yes, In Your Back Yard

A friend of the blog writes:

Saw this on Twitter. Tweeted from someone living in San Francisco. But, retweeted by someone living in St Paul.


Funny thing- I think both cities have most of those things.
I doubt either the original poster or the retweeter choose to live near those places.  Just like public transit, this list seems like a Yes in somebody else’s backyard.

That’s the thing about creeping socialilsm; it’s always inflicted on someone else.

The $15 Minimum Wage Fights Poverty…

…in exactly the same was as gun control addresses crime.

Not at all, but for the sinecure-mongering and virtue-trumpeting:

The study, led by the University of California, Irvine economist David Neumark and published by the business-backed Employment Policies Institute, finds that, over the course of decades, higher minimum wages don’t reduce poverty in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Rather, the analysis finds that a $1 increase in the minimum wage raises poverty rates and government dependency by about 3 percent.

The report also finds evidence that cash welfare fails to lower poverty.

To be fair, none of them were intended to do any such thing.

If you look at the effects of minimum wage hikes on communities of color and low income, you’d almost think they were intended to be racist.

And it’d be hard to prove you wrong:

Take, for instance, the minimum wage. The founding fathers of progressivism at the University of Wisconsin, but also such figures as Sidney Webb, saw the discriminatory aspects of the minimum wage as among its chief selling points. “Of all ways of dealing with these unfortunate parasites,” Webb said of the “unemployables,” “the most ruinous to the community is to allow them unrestrainedly to compete as wage earners.” E. A. Ross, the extremely influential progressive intellectual and author of the “race suicide” thesis (who was particularly bigoted against Chinese labor), explained the benefits of a minimum wage pithily: “The Coolie cannot outdo the American, but he can underlive him.” In other words, if you force employers to only pay a white man’s wages, he will only employ white men. Royal Meeker, a Princeton economist and adviser to Woodrow Wilson, explained: “Better that the state should support the inefficient wholly and prevent the multiplication of the breed than subsidize incompetence and unthrift, enabling them to bring forth more of their kind.”

Coates doesn’t mention the words “liberal” or “progressive” or “conservative. His indictment is aimed squarely at “America.” And as a collective matter, America surely deserves blame for the mistreatment of African Americans in the past. But it’s also worth noting that the more immediate authors of the “half-assed social contract” Coates rightly denounces are today counted as champions of the progressive movement.

As in all other things progressive – it’s better to appear to be doing good than to actually do good.

If At First You Don’t Succeed…

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

Not enough houses. We need to build more. And people can’t afford them because they have too much student loan debt from worthless college degrees. We need to subsidize mortgages again, just like before the last real estate crash.
The answer to social engineering failures is never to stop social engineering. The failures only prove that the agenda was not implemented sufficiently. This time, it will be different.
Wondering if the Narrative may be flawed doesn’t make you intelligent, it makes you a hater. Why is that?
Joe doakes

The problem with Narratives is, eventually you have to prop ’em up with bread and circuses.

Danger, Wisconsin

Democrats are fleeing the hellholes they and their policy created

…but bringing the politics that caused the problem with them:

According to the latest United Van Lines year-end list, the top five states people are leaving is made up mostly of liberal, Democrat infested states. Of the top five worst states, only the last, Kansas, has a GOP dominated government. The other four Illinois (a state that usually tops nearly every metric that marks a failed state), New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut are all hopelessly Democrat.

Another liberal state that is losing citizens faster than it is gaining replacements is the failed state of California. A recent Mises Institute report showed that California, New York, and Illinois were losing more citizens to other U.S. states far faster than the rest of the country.

Indeed, a recent report by San Francisco’s CBS affiliate noted that people are leaving the Bay area in droves because no one who isn’t a billionaire can afford to live there due to high taxes and exorbitant property costs.

On the other hand, another study showed that the top five states Americans are moving into were nearly all Republican states. with Idaho, Washington State, Nevada, Tennessee, and Alaska topping the list — Washington being the only Democrat-dominated state on that list.

It’s nothing new; it’s how Vermont, Colorado, and Edina Minnesota all went from solid conservative holdouts to Democrat cesspools.

I do love Glenn Reynold’s idea:

GOP donors need to set up a sort of “weclome wagon” to target blue state emigrants and epxlain why the Red States they’re moving to are better than the places they left”

I’d worry that the MNGOP has some trouble with new arrivals – but I don’t think we’re one of the states that’s gaining.

Maybe all you folks in CD3?