Calling BS On BS

A friend of the blog emails:

Here we continue the liberal saga perpetuated by white men that women and people of color do not have any power. I haven’t looked back far enough in history to see if Andy Richter was happy that Clarence Thomas was appointed and sharing power with white Supreme Court justices. 

Of course, more recently, liberals still aren’t accepting that there actually has been a demographic and ideological shift going on. Women and people of color may not have admitted to pollsters that they were supporting Trump, but they did. 
So, I am curious, what does “sharing power” with people of color mean? Does it mean we only accept those people of color who share the liberal ideas as people who are worthy to share our power? Or does it mean we actually look around and see we already have a pretty diverse country with lots of men, women, of all races, who hold vastly diverse opinions on the political spectrum and who already hold various levels of power, including independently minded voting? I think we are already there, and I think that’s what bothers white men like Richter. 

My two cents – since “progressives”, especially flappy jaws like RIchter, don’t recognize the legitimacy of any power from outside the “progressive” orbit, I think this sort of outburst is mostly self-purging – progressive honkies “sharing” meaningless “power” with the people to whom they’ve denied it.

The opinions of people outside the “progressive” sphere, white or black, male or female, are irrelevant at best, apostatic at worst.

18 thoughts on “Calling BS On BS

  1. It’s never been a secret or surprise that the harder someone tries to be inclusive, the more racist or sexist or biased they actually become.

  2. Plenty of examples of how wypipul should go about sharing power with “people of color”.

    Rhodesia; Kenya; Liberia; South Africa; Somalia come to mind. Just follow the plan and eberyting b OK.

  3. Come to think about it, no need to go to Africa for examples. We’re sharing power right here already!

    Baltimore, Philly, Detroit, Kansas City, Chicago, Oakland, LA are all power sharing success stories. And hey, St. Paul is rolling like that too!

    We’re pretty special.

  4. It’s words, so analyze tweets like literature. Who is the intended reader? What information is the writer trying to convey to the intended reader.

  5. One of my co-workers is a Liberal Democrat. Always mouths the correct platitudes. Diversity. Inclusiveness. Affirmative action.

    But he works in an office doing nice, clean work with decent pay and full benefits, and sends his kids to a STEM school so they can get a good education to get into a good college and have successful careers of their own.

    Dude – if you sincerely believe in the programs you claim are morally essential to redress historical wrongs, if you have the courage of your convictions, then you should step down from your cushy job so that some other, more morally deserving Person of Color could have it. It’s the Right Thing to Do.

    And if you sincerely believed White Privilege is a bad thing that is killing our society, then your kids are beneficiaries of it and are simply Oppressors In Training. You should pull them out of STEM school, sacrifice their careers so other, more morally deserving People of Color can get the jobs your kids might have had. It’s the Right Thing to Do.

    If you actually believe that your life is evil, you should change your ways.

    If you won’t change your ways, then either (a) you don’t believe what you say, making you a hypocrite, or (b) you don’t believe the rules apply to you, making you an elitist willing to sacrifice other people’s lives, but not your own.

    When all the journalists and politicians calling for people to make personal sacrifices, start making personal sacrifices of their own, then I’ll consider their suggestion. Until then, I have a suggestion for my own . . . .

  6. I’m going for “(b) you don’t believe the rules apply to you, making you an elitist willing to sacrifice other people’s lives, but not your own.”
    The ability of people to justify the actions that make their lives more enjoyable is limitless.

  7. Richter is gay.
    White people are much more accepting of homosexuality than brown & black people.
    Don’t listen to people who want to be ruled by people who hate them.

  8. Subtitle of an article in this month’s Atlantic: The future depends on a robust scientific workforce, but millions of minority students are massively underrepresented in these fields.
    In this case the conjuction “but” is used to connect coordinate and contrary elements, as though a “robust scientific workforce” requires equal representation in the sciences from minority students. This is a very difficult thing to prove; the greatest scientific advances mankind has undergone occurred when the scientific workforce consisted of white men, and over-represented by Jews.
    And why are the words “massive” and “millions” in there?
    If you read the rest of the article, you’ll find the solution the authors to a creating a robust scientific workforce is racial discrimination — just like the solution they came up with in the bad old days!
    I may not be one of them fancy scientist fellas, but I know that “regress” is the opposite of “progress.”

  9. The future depends on a robust scientific workforce, but millions of minority students are massively underrepresented in these fields.

    Sure, but many millions more will be shut out because credentials have become a barrier to experience.

    Can anyone actually show a positive correlation between schooling and competence?

  10. In the hard sciences, yes, because it brutally winnows out the weaker students. Long hours doing intellectual gruntwork as a BS culls the mentally unfit and leaves little time for social or family life. A PhD from CalTech or MIT is a far greater achievement than a PhD from occidental or Purdue. It is a grueling program with little hope of monetary pay off, but with intellectual cachet. This is why it attracts students from bourgeois backgrounds, they can fall back on something else.

  11. In the hard sciences, yes,

    Meh. An emphatic maybe. Some of the worst (as in least able to accomplish the work) engineers I worked with had PhDs and some of the best (especially the hardware engineers) had no degree at all.

    I accept that CalTech and MIT are (were anyway) superior schools that could graduate superior students to perform research. As to their abilities to actually do work that wasn’t research oriented, maybe not so much. I have no strong opinion about supposedly lesser engineering schools except that the engineers with whom I worked who graduated from them (Purdue, Lehigh, NDSU, etc) were anywhere from good to effing great.

    Fortunately, software and electrical engineering are still fields in which one might get a chance to show one’s abilities without a degree. I doubt this is the case with civil engineering and can’t speak to any of the others.

  12. MP, that “but” reveals either the author’s rejection of science, or his confidence that his audience rejects it.

    Science instructs us not only as to why minorities are underrepresented in STEM careers, but why they are overrepresented in prison.

    It’s science, but not rocket science.

    The Chinese are recolonizing Africa. The hold the deed to 40 African bandanna republics. They are building apartheid without naming it; separate living and dining areas, schools, everything. African population is being replaced with smart, dedicated

    The American population is being replaced with low IQ, uneducated refugees, Its quote possible that America trades places with Africa as a third world shithole.

  13. I feel I need to elaborate a bit.

    I do think Mexiguatasalvidorian people have things to offer. Same with Negroes.

    They bring some spice to life, literally and figuratively. I grew up with Mexicans and I know they are mostly hard working family people…they make good Americans when there is time between waves to assimilate.

    However, their gifts do not include entrepreneurship, or ground breaking science, or innovative manufacturing.

    So, to take advantage of the good things they do offer, we need to maintain a population balance that supports overall success. And that balance isn’t 50/50.

    And it doesn’t include any Somalis.

  14. Swiftee wrote:
    The Chinese are recolonizing Africa. The hold the deed to 40 African bandanna republics. They are building apartheid without naming it; separate living and dining areas, schools, everything. African population is being replaced with smart, dedicated
    I’ve tooting this horn for a decade. Nobody cares, they think I am lying. Wouldn’t the legacy media tell them if the Chinese were turning Africa into their colony? The Chinese are doing the same thing in the Philippines and SE Asia.
    Our elites are obsessed with Russia, a dying nation with a GDP smaller than Italy’s GDP.

  15. “jdm on November 30, 2019 at 11:30 am said:

    In the hard sciences, yes,

    Meh. An emphatic maybe. Some of the worst (as in least able to accomplish the work) engineers I worked with had PhDs and some of the best (especially the hardware engineers) had no degree at all.”

    PhD’s in the hard sciences do research. They are scientists in the truest sense of the word. I know that there are a lot of PhD’s awarded in CS and other engineering professions, but they don’t do research. They don’t publish, or, if they do, it is secondary to their career of project management.
    The defense industry hires a lot of PhD’s, but even if they do research, they can’t publish. They aren’t real scientists and they know it.

  16. In a meritocracy, the person with the best credentials gets the job. Ah, but which are the “best” credentials?

    Candidate A has a degree from a prestigious institution, outstanding test scores, an engaging personality, lifetime of hard work and achievement.

    Candidate B is the correct racial minority.

  17. MP, in the early 80’s I was working in R&D at Raychem Corp., in Menlo Park, CA.

    They used to fund professors from Stanford, UC & others to work on research applicable to their core product lines (high voltage cable accessories). I got to work with a lot of really smart people; changed my life.

    One guy stands out in my memory, Dr. Phil Barkin; not because he was that much smarter than other guys I got the chance to work with, but because of the large crew of Grad students & PhD candidates he brought with him from Stanford.

    These guys could calculate the shit out of arc extinction and corona induced insulation failure, but some were constantly injuring themselves with tools. It was a regular thing to walk into one of the labs and find needle nose pliers & such, laying in large puddles of blood.

    I saw a guy stick a pencil through the grating around a cable charging experiment, to point at something I guess, and watch the pencil disintegrate into a firery mist…he’s lucky he didn’t get killed.

    I could tell the difference between the guys suited to pure research and those who were going to do practical engineering right away. They were all really smart, but some were destined to strictly writing papers.

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