Why Do Blue States Hate Blue States (And Territories) So Much?

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

Why Puerto Rico is still without power, and will be for a long time.  Money quotes:
“The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, known as PREPA, is unable to complete the task of restoring power on its own: It is bankrupt, just like the Puerto Rican government . . .

“Maria delivered a near-knockout blow to PREPA, which was in deep crisis before any storm hit. For many years, it was unable, or unwilling, to invest in its four-decade-old power plants, which still burn imported oil, and above-ground power lines that were vulnerable to storms. Rolling blackouts and brownouts become common . . .

“PREPA struggled with a multi-billion-dollar deficit and a worker shortage — all while charging some of the highest rates in the United States. The utility relies on its own cash reserves to operate, and has no access to capital markets, a shortfall that is expected to worsen as its revenue collections cease during the power outage . . .

“Once the damage assessment is done, PREPA, along with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the U.S Department of Energy and the APPA, can send workers and equipment to the island to help . . .

Oddly, the article fails to mention WHY the government is bankrupt.  It’s an island paradise, tourism is strong, where did the money go?  Bad luck?  Hurricanes?  Trump?

No, they pissed it all away through the usual Blue State shenanigans:  social programs, cronyism, and union benefits for government workers.  And you’re going to pay for it.  It’ll be the largest bailout to date, and it’ll be snuck through as emergency assistance, including loans that will never be repaid, grants, and just look in the fine print and the back pages and total up the amounts that will be tacked on for public art, ecological impact studies, culture and race equity assessments and payouts, etc.

Those poor children, suffering, how can you refuse to help?  You should be happy to pay for a better Puerto Rico.  And once you’ve paid for them, how can you refuse to pay for Chicago?  

Joe Doakes

Never waste a crisis.

29 thoughts on “Why Do Blue States Hate Blue States (And Territories) So Much?

  1. This is PR’s best chance to get a bailout, and frankly it was their only hope at buying time. Note that I did not say recover — they’re too stupidily Blue to make the changes necessary to recover despite all the money that will be sent their way. They’ll fall to frittering it away and all this influx of cash will do is delay the reckoning by a decade or so.

  2. Trump is dealing with the much greater threat to America: people kneeling during the National Anthem.

  3. Oddly, I agree with Emery.

    Liberals who eschew decorum, who abhor personal-life boundaries, who insist on turning every occasion into a political controversy (hector your family at Thanksgiving to support Obama-care), who justify violence in response to the mildest dissent, are a greater danger to the perseverance of the republic than the question of how much more money Congress will throw at Puerto Rico.

    Flag burners, professor beaters, statue topplers, anthem kneelers, they’re all part of the same movement to tear down the institutions of orderly society that has been marching since the 60’s. Until now, ordinary Americans had no spokesman to call out the wreckers for what they are. But every time President Trump points out another example and the media/academia/Hollywood goes crazy defending the vandals, ordinary Americans see how much more dangerous the situation has become and see clearly the one man standing up to do something about it.

    You’re right, Emery. Trump is doing wonderful work. Glad we agree.

  4. I doubt anyone sitting at home watching a game on TV stands for the anthem. Have you ever seen the beer line during the anthem? It is longer than the very long bathroom line.

  5. Maybe Trump should kneel and show disrespect for what PR needs during this emergency? Is that how someone is supposed to react when confronted with a state that’s failing your expectations in some way? Because PR has certainly failed nearly every expectation of good governance over the years, so I guess you’re trying to argue that Trump is doing the wrong thing by trying to help. After all, the governor of Puerto Rico is praising Trump’s attention and effort:

    The president has been very attentive to the situation, personally calling me several times. FEMA and the FEMA director have been here in Puerto Rico twice. As a matter of fact, they were here with us today, making sure that all the resources in FEMA were working in conjunction with the central government.

    I’m trying to make sense of your argument Em, but it’s nonsensical in respect to this attempted threadjack. Despite what the leftist idiot-sphere is saying, the folks actually involved understand that it’s tough to move things across a thousand miles of ocean and get them to people in need as quickly as everyone would like. It’s a lot easier to drive down the road and fix a transformer than it is to ship it over seas.

  6. You sound like somebody who has no argument.

    My, my… look who just lost an argument. But never fear. eTASS will be back for more threadjacking and punishment. When all you have are libturd talking points, that is all you can do.

  7. Regarding Puerto Rico, it strikes me that the most damaging precedent is the UAW bailout–some think it was GM and Chrysler, but when you follow the money, all the benefits simply prevented the UAW from taking a haircut. So the principle “you’re part of the problem, you need to be part of the solution” was seriously downgraded there.

    And it’s not just Chicago, but rather the whole state of Illinois, which is in trouble. Double trouble, really, because to do anything, you’ve got to get the whole state to approve a constitutional amendment to allow pensioners to participate in the haircut. I further guess a lot of states, ours included, are lining up for the opportunity as the true costs of unfunded liabilities become clear.

  8. Puerto Rico would be on the line asking Trump if he could spare what passes for a thought, but communications are down. So we get this instead.

  9. The situation in PR is dire. They’ll need to get shelter, water, and food to the folks that have lost their homes. The ports will need to be opened. Then power up and running, which will require the roads to be cleared, materials staged, and skilled people in place to restore the grid. These will be monumental tasks, these maps give some idea what they’re up against.
    http://www.worldportsource.com/ports/PRI.php
    http://energia.pr.gov/en/portfolio-category/maps/

    PR problems dwarf the already huge ones in VI, DR, and throughout the Caribbean.

  10. Again, the PR governor :”The president has been very attentive to the situation, personally calling me several times. FEMA and the FEMA director have been here in Puerto Rico twice. As a matter of fact, they were here with us today, making sure that all the resources in FEMA were working in conjunction with the central government.”

    So it appears that communications are not down at the highest levels.

  11. Trump’s PR tweets, not quoted here, show him for the callous narcissist he is – he focuses on how PR has enormous debt (“to Wall Street”) and a poor electrical grid, implicitly suggesting that the island has itself to blame for its situation and shouldn’t expect any handouts. While there are many things we can say about ineptitude and corruption on part of successive PR governments, two successive hurricanes are not their fault and Trump’s emotionally detached, not to say cold-hearted, tone is abhorrent.

  12. Somehow the whole deal reminds me of former Chicago Mayor Michael Blandic. Just like Chicagoans were acutely aware of snow, Puerto Ricans are acutely aware of their location in “Hurricane Alley”. The difference is that in PR, one disaster can impact the whole region, and they’re historically poor. Not a good combination.

  13. Regarding PREMA’s problems, one of the most interesting things in the link Scott provided was that a huge portion of electric power use in PR is “unmetered”, which would mean there’s an agreement to provide the power for free, or it’s flat out stolen. Good luck maintaining a power grid even without hurricanes if the utility can’t be bothered to bill customers and punish power thieves.

    Yes, two hurricanes in a year matters, but quite frankly, if you ignore the fact that a great portion of your product is being stolen, good luck hardening your distribution network for foreseeable disasters. This is akin to New Orleans spending levee money on a casino, really.

  14. The federal ***response*** is fine, ***given everything***.

    The USN is majorly strained, but that has nothing to do with Trump.

    FEMA is obviously a lot better than it ever has been.

  15. Trump’s PR tweets, not quoted here, show him for the callous narcissist he is

    Bereft of any original thought to argue his losing position, eTASS misdirects and threadjacks with a non-sequitur. How predictable. What a maroon.

  16. TFS: “FEMA is obviously a lot better than it ever has been.

    Damn straight. During Andrew FEMA was totally useless. Home Depot and Walmart did far better at bringing in supplies and getting relief efforts going than FEMA. Being a Federal agency it only took a decade and a half before they began to get their stuff together, but they seem to have a clue these days. (Not saying it’s the current management by any means. But it’s good to see that Trump seems to be involved and sensible when it comes to making sure the services are provided as best they can be. The man’s doing better than he’s talking.)

  17. The man’s doing better than he’s talking.

    Did anyone do a language score on sTrumpet? It must be at the toddler level. It pains to hear him talk.

  18. Emery complains Trump is ” . . . implicitly suggesting that the island has itself to blame for its situation and shouldn’t expect any handouts.”

    I don’t imply it, I’ll tell you flat out – the island has itself to blame for pissing away the money and shouldn’t expect any handouts.

    The hurricane didn’t cause the situation. The hurricane revealed the situation. The people who’ve been running Puerto Rico caused the situation. Rewarding failure gets you more failure. Failure is meant to hurt. That’s how people learn from mistakes. That’s not callous. That’s tough love.

  19. I’d phrase it somewhat differently, Joe. I think we ought to help, but with conditions. For example, a couple of billion to get them power again? Sure, but on the condition that the utility map out where they’re not getting paid and take action about that. Help with a bankrupt government? Sure, but on the condition that all parties, including government retirees, share in the pain, and that non-essential government items be sold off.

    If my reading of Scott’s data regarding their power system is halfway correct, what it means is that the entire population has gotten used to looking the other way at theft and graft, and as a result they’re the U.S.’s equivalent of a third world country. You’ve got to address that culture to help them along.

    #ToughLove

  20. I see sTrumpet suspended Jones Act to benefit Puerto Rico recovery. But did not do so for Texas and Florida. Why does he hate red states so much?

  21. JPA; we might say that PR has already achieved the foreseeable consequences of what they want the entire country to become, yes. The one quibble I have is that progressives generally would at least not admit they want a decimated power system and the like.

    And I’d guess the suspended Jones Act has to do with the fact that a great portion of U.S. flagged and built shipping is perfectly capable of sailing the intracoastal waterway, sheltered by barrier islands from storms, but is not robust at sea. Hence you can get relief to Texas and Florida without suspending it, but not PR. Plus, as far as I can tell, the sheer volume of aid that is needed is far higher in PR.

  22. The one quibble I have is that progressives generally would at least not admit they want a decimated power system and the like.

    But they do. Their desire for green, green, green is a recipe for decimation.

    Plus, as far as I can tell, the sheer volume of aid that is needed is far higher in PR.

    It is not just aid. Suspension of Jones Act for TX would have helped tremendously to get the petchem industry back on its feet quicker, as well as relieve delivery bottlenecks. While I am not belittling amount of aid PR needs, the actual dollar impact to the Harvey-impacted region in continental US is likely higher.

  23. Is it time for Puerto Rico exit? Medium-size Caribbean island for sale. As is. No money down. Assume liabilities. Present owner abandoning ownership role.

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