Princess Pander

It’s almost a year until the convention, but Saint Paul DFL gubernatorial candidate Erin Murphy’s campaign is already doomed.

Rep. Erin Murphy, doomed gubernatorial candidate

Perhaps with that in mind, she’s swinging for the (Metrocrat) fences, calling for single payer helathcare:

Murphy criticizes capitalist models of health care, saying that a for-profit model of any part of the health care system is bad for Americans. She tells a story of her dying mother’s struggle to get her insurance company to cover the care she needed for cancer treatments near the end of her life.

“We must guarantee health care for people who are sick, focus on the health of Minnesotans, and control health care costs,” Murphy wrote. “We must make strategic and difficult choices with valuable resources, putting the health of Minnesotans ahead of health insurance profit making.”

Asked how this plan would be paid for, Murphy responded “with golden coins borne down from heaven by unicorns [1]”

[1] Fake but conceptually accurate.

 

12 thoughts on “Princess Pander

  1. She tells a story of her dying mother’s struggle to get her insurance company to cover the care she needed for cancer treatments near the end of her life.

    Under Murphy’s scheme, death panels will deny care to her mother. Why does Murphy hate her own mother so much that she wishes she die prematurely? Or is she really that clueless? Oh, wait… There is a D behind her name. Nevermind…

  2. Which country has a “capitalist market for health care”? Certainly not the US. Government’s footprint is a huge portion of GDP, and there is little consumer choice for products in the private and employer-paid insurance sectors.
    Any healthcare system that is humane will spend large amounts of money on the people least likely to make for a good ROI.
    If you want an economically efficient system, cull the weak and the sick.
    There is no shortage of horror stories about poor or nonexistent care in countries that have single-payer.
    I know! Let’s send all of our sick people to Russia! They have free health care!

  3. Murphy can thank a member of her own party, the vaunted “Liberal Lion” of the Senate, Ted “Chappaquiddick” Kennedy, for much of the mess we have today. He authored the first HMO bill in the 70s, because the Left, seemingly guided more by emotion than rational thought, thought it was only fair that peasants citizens could belong to an organization that could nickle-and-dime bargain on behalf of their members to keep health care costs low. Right. Instead, Kennedy set the stage to replace the unfairness of this thing called “life” with a bureacracy. Seems like we traded “unfair” for “heartless”.

    Of course, Murphy and her ilk zero in on the profit motive, as though that’s the impediment to quality care. If that were true, we wouldn’t have wealthy people from all over the world flying to the U.S. to obtain medical care.

    So let’s replace a for-profit bureacratic organization with a non-profit one? Personally, I’ve seen NPOs that suffer from incompetent management, corruption, and a steady dance with bankruptcy, due to the people running them thinking profit is “evil.” The thing is, profit is neither good nor evil, but it does provide a crystal-clear measure of how well a business performs. Without profit, what incentive remains? Altruism is the domain of the starry-eyed do-gooder, and it has a relatively short shelf life.

    Profit also helps businesses expand, something that will be necessary if health-care is to keep up with a growing population that is also staying alive longer.

  4. Which country has a “capitalist market for health care”? Certainly not the US.

    MP, this is the closest I’ve come to seeing a capitalist model in place in health care: After relocating to IA from MN while working a contract job for a company here, I opted to not have health insurance during a time when a big chunk of my paycheck was going to paying rent on an apartment here, the mortgage on my house in Minnesota, and a car payment. So I rolled the dice… and I ended up needing to visit the hospital at one point. I observed indirectly how much hospitals and clinics like dealing with HMOs and PPOs versus “self-pay”: If I paid my medicals bills in full at the end of a clinic or hospital visit, they would deduct 20% from the cost. To the hospitals and clinics, that 20% must represent a huge savings in time for their staff to deal with the insurance companies, fewer trees killed in completed insurance forms, etc.

  5. These DFL candidates all sound so much alike, I should toss my hat in the ring just to give the other candidates something to talk about. From her campaign web page:

    “As the daughter of a union auto worker, I understand the importance of a reliable job that pays a living wage.” Joe says: Union contracts loaded so much debt onto the American auto industry that it went bankrupt under Obama, despite taxpayer bailouts. Employees at plants in the South such as Toyota and Mercedes agree that it’s better to earn a non-union wage than no wage at all.

    “As the mother of twin girls, I know that we need an education system that prepares every child to be successful and ready to participate in the economy of our future.” Joe says: If no child is left behind, then no child can get ahead. Intentionally dumbing down society leaves our children unprepared to compete. Keeping everyone equally ignorant is fair, but stupid.

  6. Intentionally dumbing down society leaves our children unprepared to compete

    JD, and right on cue we have UofIA students talking about “intelligence privilege”. Have we sold ourselves enough rope? Are we already hanging?

  7. Pingback: In The Mailbox: 08.04.17 : The Other McCain

  8. I’ll tell her the story of how only in this great country could I get the post-strole care o got. In Europe and Canada I wouldn’t have gotten any rehab. Sorry this is getting kinda personal for me now when I hear this shit

  9. To draw a picture of how much our current insurance system costs, I remember noting that there were four people doing insurance in a pediatrics office, but only two pediatricians. The receptionist quickly corrected me, as there were not four people doing that job, but rather seven.

    Sad to say, Charlie Gard is unavailable for comment about the glories of nationalized health care.

  10. Sad to say, Charlie Gard is unavailable for comment about the glories of nationalized health care.

    What does Charlie Gard have in common with your average suburban family room of the 1960s?

    They both got paneled to death.

    Too soon? It needs to be too soon.

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