Mission Accomplished

Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

Okay, technically it’s Minneapolis, but still, national prominence.
No wonder Congresswoman Omar has time to go jetting off to Israel.  Her work here is done.
 Joe Doakes

We have a generation or two of voters in MInneapolis – mostly white “progressives” and the younger minorities they miseducated – who think that’s a Congressperson’s job.

22 thoughts on “Mission Accomplished

  1. Notice on the list of 30 districts that 24 of them are represented by Democrats – many of them for decades

  2. Never thought I’d be in the position of defending Rep. Omar, and I’m really not. However, the article explains the dismal circumstances of the districts with the familiar (and untrue) prog tropes blaming the usual suspects.
    ” Disparate outcomes along racial lines in the district are largely the legacy of historic racism. Minneapolis is one of several Midwestern cities that enacted restrictive housing covenants and exclusionary zoning policies in the early 20th century. These policies impact residential patterns to this day.”
    So please explain to me how all the other locations in the US, which presumably had the same history of restrictive covenants, ended up with better outcomes?

  3. “Minneapolis is one of several Midwestern cities that enacted restrictive housing covenants and exclusionary zoning policies in the early 20th century. These policies impact residential patterns to this day.”
    I am going to call BS. The restrictive covenants weren’t forced on an unwilling population. There was never a time or a place in the US where blacks and whites voluntarily integrated, covenants or no covenants.
    This should be easy to prove — make a list of cities that did not have race restrictive covenants and compare them to those that did. Something like this: https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-most-diverse-cities-are-often-the-most-segregated/
    Bu putting the weight of guilt on the City of Minneapolis (which, unlike the racists of a century ago, still exists), the race hustlers have a deep-pocket mark.

  4. I’m having trouble believing that Omar’s district, horrible as it is for blacks, is worse for them than some of the districts on the South Side of Chicago, in South Central LA, the one I grew up on that contains Gary IN, etc.. At least judging by crime rates and abject poverty, the Mini Apple has nothing on some of what I’ve seen.

    Unless the real difference here is that in those districts, blacks are poorer, less educated, etc., than whites, and we conservatives are rightly suspicious about such statistics. Hypothetically, if a wealthy city helped a large population of minorities come there and get their feet on the first few rungs of the economic ladder–immeasurably improving their status–they would score right up there with Omar’s district. It’s kind of a nonsense stat. Lots wrong with the Mini Apple, but we need to get some perspective here.

  5. I call BS as well.

    Prior to the Municipal Planning Act in 1965, Minnesota cities had no statutory authority to enact zoning ordinances. The state did empower cities to create Restricted Residence Zones starting in 1916, but it wasn’t to keep out Blacks, it was a plan to gradually rid residential neighborhoods of industrial uses through a plan of amortization and compensation.

    https://www.revisor.mn.gov/laws/1915/0/Session+Law/Chapter/128/pdf/

    The real racial restrictions came from the Truman Administration, through loan guarantee regulations that required developers to include racial restrictions in the development covenants, in order to qualify for federally insured loans. The feds wanted to make sure home values wouldn’t be diluted by colored people moving into nice neighborhoods, because that would impair the value of the collateral pledged for the loans.

  6. So please explain to me how all the other locations in the US, which presumably had the same history of restrictive covenants, ended up with better outcomes?

    And what were those people so worried about, anyway, Golfdoc? North Minneapolis is full of vibrancy today after diversity was mandated.

  7. Omar and her cohorts in ‘The Squad’ — are four professional victims and an example of all that is wrong with the Democrat Party and its current obsession with Identity Politics and it’s “oppressor-victim” narrative.

    These people are God’s gift to Trump. He has a remarkable ability to sense weakness and exploit it. His racist provocations forced the Democrats to rally around ‘The Squad’ thus serving his electoral objectives. Like the brexiteers, he is defined by opposition, and if he can’t find a suitable target, he will create one.

  8. In spite of the fact that I wasn’t really trying to threadjack – honest! I just find Babylon Bee to be so hilarious – I agree with the other people here that raise suspicions about the relationship between the state of CD5 and Omar’s unfinished first term. To be honest, I had the same problem with whatsisface and the state of Baltimore as well.

    My take tho’ is that the rules have changed and making virtuous but baseless accusations to own political opponents is now in force. So, eff ’em.

  9. ” . . . His racist provocations . . . .” Geez, Emery, that’s so gay.

    What? I meant “carefree, bright, cheerful,” as in ‘A Christmas Carol’ where Bob Cratchet’s wife wears a dress that is “. . . twice turned but gay in ribbons which are cheap and make a goodly show for sixpence.”

    Wait – you mean Liberals have captured ordinary words and perverted their meaning to something completely different?

    Oh, I see. That explains why the word that formerly meant “a belief that race is the primary determinant of human traits and capacities and that racial differences produce an inherent superiority of a particular race” is now used to mean “something I don’t like.”

    This is part of that whole “long march through the institutions” thing that Gramsci started, isn’t it? Lewis Carroll wrote about it:

    “When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.” “The question is,” said Alice, “whether you can make words mean so many different things.” “The question is,” said Humpty Dumpty, “which is to be master—that’s all.”

  10. Joe Doakes, the “Trump is a racisssst!” thing has me scratching my head, too. He denies being a racist. He has said that he is the least racist president in history, ever. Trump is not one of those Aryan Brotherhood/KKK types who brags about their racism. Neither is he a racist who hides his racism behind good manners: “I’d love to have a Black family move in next door! If they were the right kind of people. But it would play Hell with my property values. Some of my best friends are Black!”
    And then there is the “secret code” or “dog whistle” theory that began with Reagan’s comments about “welfare queens.” This theory is that Trump uses “code phrases” to refer to racial topics that only his followers can decode properly, such as codes for the letter ‘Q,’ which is supposed represent ‘Q-anon,’ which I don’t know anything about, and also furtive references to the number 8, which refers to the letter ‘H,’ the eighth letter in the alphabet, and is sekrit kode for “HH” or HEIL HITLER! Great code, fellas.
    Also something about a frog named ‘Pepe’ and making a furtive ‘Okay’ sign during photo ops and press conferences, because the ‘Okay’ sign means “WHITE POWER!”

    Jesus, the lefties are loonies.

  11. Joe, I’ve got a million dollar idea.

    Remember “mood rings”? Well, I want to create the “Mood MAGA Hat”.

    It will change the MAGA logo depending on what the leftist reprobate in your face is spewing.

    “You’re a RAAAAAACIST!!” *Poof!* Your hat now says “PROUD RACIST”
    “Homophobe!!!” *Poof!* Your hat now says “PROUD HOMOPHOBE”

    & etc. Xenophobe, Misogynist, White Supremacist, all of the reprobates favorites right back at ’em.

  12. Not a bad idea swiftee but with how long it takes products to get to market these days you should have come up with the idea in 2015

  13. We also need to do something apparel related to Pinochets helicopter tours, thats a freaking gold mine.

  14. Question is, how many people (especially millenials) would get that? Not to mention that is the best trolling shirt Ive ever seen. I mean they already call us Nazis and fascists so why not go all out

  15. Prior to the Municipal Planning Act in 1965, Minnesota cities had no statutory authority to enact zoning ordinances. – Joe Doakes

    Technically that is true – but the reality was that red-lining was very real. The lines were sharp and the enforcement was brutal, often boarding on ethnic cleansing.

    I had a number of paper routes in Saint Paul in the early and mid 60’s along Lexington and later Selby Ave. Take Central Ave for instance. West of Lexington, it was exclusively white, east of Lexington, exclusively black, except for a row of apartments facing west on Lexington, these were exclusively white. The difference between black and white was literally measure in feet and as sharp as a ruler.

    The same for Selby, though a few white families lived north of Selby, they did so at their own risk, many of them were trapped. To my knowledge, in the mid-60’s, no black family lived to the east of Selby.

    In 1969, the first black family appeared on our block. They were fine people (and I am not just saying that) but the night they moved in, real-estate agents canvased the block and encouraged everyone to sell cheap and save at least a little of their equity.

    My old man bought our house in 1959 for $10,000 and sold it for $7,200 after the block was “busted” in 1969. In 2008, that house sold for $850,000, so go figure.

    While there never was a formal system, the informal system was quite effective.

    However, as for the concept that what happened 50 years ago causes problems today, I agree with you. BULLSHIT.

    As a paper-boy, I was quite aware of how many households had two loving and hardworking parents, and in the black neighborhood of Saint Paul in early 1960’s most did. In fact there were more intact black families there then than are intact white suburban families today.

    And that is everything.

  16. Where I grew up, 20 miles from Gary IN, it seemed like about half the population over a certain age had left Gary back in the 1960s due to neighborhood busting. It left a mark on their views of racial issues, to put it mildly. And yes, whether Mom and Dad were married made all the difference, both in my hometown and 20 miles to the west.

  17. Greg, I don’t deny people acted more openly about race in those days. I deny government did, which was the claimed reason why Black people in Minneapolis live in a hell-hole today. I think the private-public distinction makes a difference.

    “Minneapolis is one of several Midwestern cities that enacted restrictive housing covenants and exclusionary zoning policies in the early 20th century.” – from the report.

    The claim is that the CITY imposed restrictive covenants on private land, the CITY zoned areas “No Blacks Allowed.” Government action. I’d like to see the link to prove it.

    I don’t deny White people fled when Black people moved in; I deny that people making a voluntary choice where to live is the same as government making the choice where races are allowed to live. The first is freedom of association; the latter is segregation.

    This is an interesting summary of fair housing history (it’s from Boston, but the national trends are identified). Click links at left for different periods.

    https://bostonfairhousing.org/timeline/1934-1968-FHA-Redlining.html

    By 1919, all municipal racial zoning ordinances were unconstitutional. That’s 100 years ago, four generations back. The burdens my great-great-grandfather faced cannot fairly be blamed for holding me back.

    The report is BS.

  18. Greg, I don’t deny people acted more openly about race in those days. I deny government did, which was the claimed reason why Black people in Minneapolis live in a hell-hole today.

    I totally agree.

    Red-lining was a real-estate practice, not a governmental mandate.

    In days of yore, the first question a real-estate agent asked was, “Where do you go to church?” Even over the telephone, the answer revealed your race, ethnicity, religion and income range.

    They then plunked you among your own.

    One could say this was highly discriminatory and it certainly was., but that was the point and it made for strong close-knit neighborhoods.

    Today, this sorting out process is more user driven. It is like a high-school cafeteria where like hangs out with like.

    It is wrong to be shoved into a pigeon hole – but when you shove yourself into one, you shouldn’t bitch about it.

    I remember years ago when the standard excuse for poverty was that poor people couldn’t afford cars and since the bus service was so lousy, they found themselves trapped in the inner-cities. That excuse echoed through the pages of the Strib for about twenty years, until the roads became clogged with Vietnamese, Hmong, Mexican, Guatemalan and Honduran immigrants (legal or not) speeding their way to their cross town jobs.

    A new excuse had to be found.

    The lingering effects of systematic racism.

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